Category: New Hampshire

Resource Category Topic Type
What Do We Know About What to Do With Dams?
In this brief, authors Simone Chapman, Catherine Ashcraft, Lawrence Hamilton, and Kevin Gardner report the results of an October 2018 Granite State Poll that asked 607 New Hampshire residents how much they have heard, and their thoughts, concerning the question of whether older dams on New Hampshire rivers should be removed for ecological or safety reasons, or whether the dams should be kept. Most people admitted they have not heard or read about this issue, but at the same time they agreed that dams could be removed in at least some cases. The more people heard or read about the issue of dam removal, the more likely they were to support removal in some or most cases. These survey results highlight the need for communicating sound information to the public concerning the costs and benefits of possible dam management options— whether doing nothing, repairs and maintenance, or removal.
Community, Environment, and Climate Change, New Hampshire Infrastructure, New Hampshire, Public Opinion, Rivers/Watersheds Publication
What's for Dinner? Finding and Affording Healthy Foods in New Hampshire Communities
Access to healthy food is becoming increasingly difficult for some households in the Granite State, as grocery stores relocate or consolidate, leaving some residents to depend on convenience stores for basic groceries. This brief looks at recent data on food deserts in New Hampshire.
Evaluation, New Hampshire Family, Food Assistance, New Hampshire, Safety Net Publication
Why People Move to and Stay in New Hampshire
Migration is important to New Hampshire’s demographic future. Traditionally, the state has grown both because of migration into it and because of the surplus of births over deaths. However, recently all of New Hampshire’s population growth has been due to migration. In this brief, authors Kenneth Johnson and Kristine Bundschuh analyze data from the University of New Hampshire Survey Center’s Granite State Poll to examine the characteristics of two groups of current New Hampshire residents—recent migrants and established residents—to understand why people move to and choose to stay in the state. Their findings illustrate that migration decisions are influenced by an interrelated set of factors that encompass elements of the state’s social, economic, and natural environment.
Demography, New Hampshire Birth Rates, Demography, Migration, New Hampshire, Public Opinion Publication
Working Parents and Workplace Flexibility in New Hampshire
This report, a joint effort between the Carsey Institute, UNH Cooperative Extension, and New Hampshire Employment Security, looks at working parents and their job flexibility and the importance it has for families trying to achieve a work-life balance.
New Hampshire, Vulnerable Families Research Program Employment, Family, New Hampshire Publication
Youth Aspirations and Sense of Place in a Changing Rural Economy: The Coös Youth Study
Youth in rural Coös County have surprisingly strong ties to their communities, finds a new report from the Carsey Institute. The brief is the first to report on a ten-year panel study of students who began seventh and eleventh grades in 2007 in Coös, New Hampshire's northernmost and most rural county.
New Hampshire Community, Coös Youth Study, Health, New Hampshire, Rural, Young Adults Publication
Youth Opinions Matter: Retaining Human Capital in Coös County
As Coös County youth age, their attachment to their communities may deteriorate. This brief presents new data from the Coös Youth Study. This research indicates efforts to keep young people in Coös may benefit from efforts to show students that their views matter to adults in their communities.
New Hampshire Community, Coös Youth Study, Family, Health, New Hampshire, Young Adults Publication
Youths' Opinions About Their Opportunities for Success in Coös County Communities
This fact sheet examines Coös County youths’ beliefs about their access to educational and occupational opportunities in their home communities and whether these beliefs relate to their expectations for the future. To do so, author Erin Hiley Sharp draws on the Coös Youth Study data collected in 2011 from 318 eleventh graders in the public schools.
New Hampshire Community, Coös Youth Study, New Hampshire, Young Adults Publication