Category: New Hampshire

Resource Category Topic Type
Paid Family and Medical Leave in New Hampshire
Life events such as an illness, the birth of a child, or a parent’s need for care require workers to take extended time away from their jobs. The aging of the New Hampshire population and the rise of women in the labor force mean that more workers in the state are likely to need extended time away from work to provide family care. But taking the leave often means loss of pay or even loss of a job. Access to paid family and medical leave is uneven in New Hampshire. Neither the federal government nor New Hampshire have a paid family and medical leave law or program, thus access to leave depends on whether it is included as a benefit offered by one’s employer. The 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) allows certain workers to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid—but job-protected—leave to tend to a serious health condition or to care for a new child or a seriously ill relative within a 12-month period. To be eligible for FMLA, employees must work for an employer with 50 or more workers within a 75-mile radius and have worked 1,250 hours for the same employer over the previous year.1 Nationally, about 41 percent of employees are not covered by FMLA. In New Hampshire, 10 percent of firms employing fewer than 10 employees provided paid family care leave in 2011; among businesses employing 250 or more employees, 30 percent provided paid family care leave.2 Many men face stigma for taking leave, as cultural and workplace attitudes typically view men as breadwinners and women as caregivers.3 Indeed, in New Hampshire, women are more likely to take family and medical leave (paid or unpaid), yet they are less likely to have access to the benefit, according to 2016 Granite State Poll data. Furthermore, workers with the lowest family income lack access to paid leave. The current system, reliant on employer-provided paid leave and unpaid FMLA, is fragmented and unequal, with some workers having access to generous paid leave benefits and others either cobbling together paid and unpaid leave, leaving the labor force, or not providing the needed family care.
New Hampshire, Vulnerable Families Research Program Employment, New Hampshire, Public Opinion Publication
Paid Sick Time Helps Workers Balance Work and Family
In New Hampshire, workers fare better than workers nationally, yet one-quarter of Granite State workers do not have paid sick days. The lack of paid sick days places workers in a bind. They are forced to choose between caring for a sick family member or themselves and losing pay. This brief suggests that the long-term benefits of workers having paid sick days out way the cost for employers because it promotes less contagion among coworkers, increased productivity, and reduced turnover.
Vulnerable Families Research Program Community, Employment, New Hampshire, Safety Net Publication
Polling and the New Hampshire Primary
In this brief, authors David Moore and Andrew Smith discuss caveats that should be considered when interpreting what the polls mean for the February 2020 New Hampshire primary.
New Hampshire New Hampshire, Politics and Elections Publication
Resident Ownership in New Hampshire's "Mobile Home Parks": A Report on Economic Outcomes (revised 2010)
Since 1984, the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund has been helping residents of manufactured home communities purchase the land underneath their homes. Since then, homeowners have purchased 80 manufactured home communities and converted them into Resident Owned Communities (ROCs) in New Hampshire. These communities now include 4,200 homeowners.
Evaluation, New Hampshire Economic Development, Housing, New Hampshire Publication
Sixty Percent of Coös Youth Report Having a Mentor in Their Lives
In this brief, authors Kent Scovill and Corinna Jenkins Tucker describe Coös youths’ mentor relationships using data from the Carsey Institute’s Coös Youth Study collected in 2007. They report that, in 2007, a majority of Coös youth in seventh and eleventh grade (60.2 percent) report having a mentor.
New Hampshire Coös Youth Study, Health, New Hampshire, Young Adults Publication
Social Connections, Safety, and Local Environment in Three Manchester, New Hampshire, Neighborhoods
This fact sheet uses data from a survey of Bakersville, Beech Street, and Gossler Park residents in Manchester, New Hampshire, to draw attention to the current state of connectedness, trust, and perceptions of the local environment in these three neighborhoods.
New Hampshire Community, New Hampshire, Public Opinion Publication
Stay or Leave Coös County? Parents' Messages Matter
When it comes to deciding whether to stay in New Hampshire's rural Coös County or leave for other opportunities, young people are listening to their parents. Surveying 78 percent of all seventh and eleventh graders in public schools in Coös County, researchers found that young peoples' future intentions to migrate from Coös in search of economic or educational opportunities or to remain in Coös to pursue a future close to home are closely aligned with the messages their parents deliver to them.
New Hampshire Coös Youth Study, Family, Migration, New Hampshire, Young Adults Publication
Steyer Spends the Most, but Only Yang and Gabbard Focus Facebook Advertising on New Hampshire
In this data snapshot, author Jordan Hensley reports on top presidential candidate spending on Facebook ads in New Hampshire.
New Hampshire New Hampshire, Politics and Elections Publication
Stretching Ties: Social Capital in the Rebranding of Coös County, New Hampshire
Place rebranding is gaining in popularity as cities and rural communities alike attempt to expand their revenue streams through innovative marketing strategies that seek to revitalize or create tourism destinations. These efforts tend to come about as part of an economic development strategy pursued by communities that have borne steep economic losses resulting from global economic restructuring and the decline in traditional manufacturing, agriculture, and natural-resource extraction. Author Michele Dillon explores the role of social capital in rural wealth generation by focusing on how it was used to advance place rebranding in Coös County in northern New Hampshire. In Coös, as is also likely the case in other rural counties, there is a far greater number of local than regional institutions and organizations, and culturally, leaders and residents alike are more prone to think locally than regionally. Nonetheless, these local community organizations can still play an important role in regionalization efforts; their infrastructural resources (including leaders and others with a history of working together on local issues) can be strategically incorporated as in Coös to forge and strengthen regionalized bridging connections. Her case study indicates that local community social capital can be expanded and stretched to achieve inter-community, county-wide regional cooperation. In particular, the Coös Branding Project, which she examines at length, illustrates the productive value of bridging social capital in rural economic development. As Coös moves forward and continues to develop its tourism sector, ongoing community support and inter-community cooperation will be crucial to translating its newly branded place identity into a place that will attract tourism and further investment.
New Hampshire Community Development, Economic Development, New Hampshire Publication
Student Discipline in New Hampshire Schools (co-publication with the Children's Alliance of New Hampshire)
A new analysis of student discipline in New Hampshire schools in the 2007–2008 school year shows that out-of-school suspension rates are higher and statewide expulsion rates are lower than the national average. Schools reporting the highest rates of suspensions and expulsions are the smallest in the state and have the highest percentage of students in poverty. This brief is the first in a collaborative series between the Children's Alliance of New Hampshire and the Carsey Institute.
Evaluation, New Hampshire Children, Education, New Hampshire, Young Adults Publication
Teachers Matter: Feelings of School Connectedness and Positive Youth Development among Coös County Youth
Students who feel positively about their education, have a sense of belonging in school, and maintain good relationships with students and staff generally feel connected to their schools. In fact, 63 percent of Coös youth report feeling this way.
New Hampshire Coös Youth Study, Education, Health, New Hampshire, Young Adults Publication
Teen Dating Violence in New Hampshire
Dating Violence Among High School Teens Dating violence, defined as physical abuse (such as hitting) or sexual abuse (such as forcible sexual activity) that happens within the context of a current or former relationship, leads to a host of negative consequences, including poor mental and physical health and academic difficulties.1 Therefore, it is important that researchers examine factors that increase or decrease risk for dating violence, and then use this research to create evidence-based prevention and risk reduction efforts. To date, researchers have primarily focused on individual factors (for example, attitudes toward violence) and relational factors (such as peer group norms) that may be related to dating violence victimization.2 However, it is also important to examine school and community characteristics that may serve as risk or protective factors for dating violence3 and to understand which youth may be at the highest risk for dating violence victimization. Overall Rates of Dating Violence Among Teens in New Hampshire Nearly one in ten teens (9.1 percent) in New Hampshire reported being the victim of physical dating violence during the past year; across the 71 schools studied, the range was zero to 15.0 percent. More than one in ten teens (10.9 percent) reported being the victim of sexual dating violence during the past year, and the range across schools was zero to 17.0 percent. The purpose of this study was to examine how demographic characteristics such as sexual orientation, school characteristics such as the school poverty rate, and community characteristics such as the population density of the county relate to the possibility that a New Hampshire teen will be the victim of dating violence.
New Hampshire, Vulnerable Families Research Program Health, New Hampshire, Trust, Young Adults Publication
Teen Stress and Substance Use Problems in Coös: Survey Shows Strong Community Attachment Can Offset Risk
This brief explores how social stress and community attachment are related to problem alcohol and drug use for girls and boys in Coös County, New Hampshire.
New Hampshire Community, Coös Youth Study, Health, New Hampshire, Young Adults Publication
The Benefits and Barriers to Living in Coös County
In this report, author Kristine Bundschuh identifies the benefits and barriers that emerging adults, age 18–25, perceive as they make the decision to stay in, leave, or return to Coös County, New Hampshire. The main draws to living in Coös are its family and community support systems. Those with local professional and educational plans, or who have purchased a home locally, experience additional benefits. Some emerging adults say they would live in Coös if it provided the employment opportunities, diverse communities, and amenities they seek.
New Hampshire Community, New Hampshire, Young Adults Publication
The Changing Faces of New Hampshire
New Hampshire, with a total population of 1.3 million, gained 79,000 residents between 2000 and 2006. Most of this growth - 51,000 residents - came from migration. The migration also brought economic gains: New Hampshire gained at least $1.4 billion in income from migration between 2001 and 2005, and households moving in earned nearly $9,000 more than those leaving.
Demography, New Hampshire Birth Rates, Demography, Hispanics, Migration, New England, New Hampshire Publication
The First Primary: Why New Hampshire?
For the past half century, political leaders, representatives of various states, and media pundits have excoriated the premier positions that New Hampshire and Iowa hold in the presidential delegate selection process.
New Hampshire New Hampshire, Politics and Elections Publication
The Importance of Outdoor Activity and Place Attachment to Adolescent Development in Coös County, New Hampshire
This brief discusses the rates of participation in structured and unstructured outdoor activities as Coös County youth age, along with the relationship between outdoor activity involvement and indicators of place attachment throughout this period. The analysis is based on data collected between 2008 and 2013 as part of the Carsey Institute’s Panel Study of Coös County youth.
New Hampshire Community, Coös Youth Study, Health, New Hampshire, Young Adults Publication
The Slow Dawn of Climate-Change Awareness, and Its Challenge for a Sustainable Planet
In this perspectives brief, author Larry Hamilton summarizes his research on public perceptions of climate change, drawing on a decade of nationwide and New Hampshire surveys.
Community, Environment, and Climate Change Climate Change, New Hampshire, Public Opinion Publication
The State of Coös County: Local Perspectives on Community and Change
Coös County residents are largely optimistic about their future despite significant economic challenges, especially in the Berlin/Gorham area. As part of a three-pronged effort to understand the ongoing changes in New Hampshire's North Country and surrounding counties, researchers at the Carsey Institute have surveyed more than 1,700 adult residents of Coös County, New Hampshire, and Oxford County, Maine.
New Hampshire Community, Community Development, Coös Youth Study, Economic Development, New Hampshire, Public Opinion Publication
The State of Working New Hampshire 2006
While New Hampshire has the highest labor force participation (71 percent) and the second-lowest unemployment and underemployment rates in New England, recent trends in employment and wages point to growing disparities in the state, this issue brief finds. The brief provides a state-focused analysis of the Economic Policy Institute's national report, “The State of Working America 2005/2006.”
New Hampshire Employment, New Hampshire, Wages Publication