Electives

students talking around a conference table

Electives

Electives are available in many substantive areas.  Topics and courses are added on a continuing basis.

Students may propose additional electives if they make sense in terms of the student’s interests and academic plan.  Discussion with an advisor should inform this choice. 


Elective Courses are offered in many Substantive Areas, including:

  • Communication and Strategy for Policy Impact
  • Data Analysis for Public Policy  
  • Community Development
  • Poverty and Inequality
  • Health and Health Policy
  • Interpersonal Violence
  • Education and Schools
  • Environment and Natural Resources
  • Families, Youth and Children
  • Organizational Leadership
     

Departments throughout UNH offer Elective Courses, including:

  • Education
  • History
  • Sociology
  • Natural Resources
  • Political Science
  • Business Administration
  • Human Development and Family Studies
  • Health Policy and Management
  • UNH School of Law
  • Analytics

 

To view course offerings per semester, please click on the appropriate tab and select the course title you are interested in for a  course description.  

 

 

Online
Instructor: Nancy Kinner
CRN: 70450
Credits: 3
Course begins with exploration of the precept that we live in, and must design engineering works for, a world with a finite supply of natural resources and with limited life support capacity. Tools for sustainability engineering are the major focus of the course, which include life cycle, analysis and life cycle impact analysis, the metrics and mass and energy flow analyses used in the field of industrial ecology, and environmental management systems. CIE 851.1HY - CIE 851.1HY is a hybrid course. It meets May 22 - May 28, 2017 online. It then meets July 21 through July 25, 2017 at Shoals Marine Laboratory, Appledore Island. There will be asynchronous chat rooms once per week for one hour. The SML segment is 1 credit and a co-requisite.

Mondays and Wednesdays 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. | Paul College 135
Instructor: Prashant Mittal 
CRN: 70491
Credits: 3
This course is designed to give students a solid understanding of the experience in probability, and inferential statistics. The course provides a foundational understanding of statistical concepts and tools required for decision making in a data science, business, research or policy setting. The course uses case studies and requires extensive use of statistical software. 

June 5 to June 9, 2017 (Monday - Friday),   9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 
Instructor:  Michael Swack
CRN: 70168 
Credits: 3
This course aims to provide students with a general introduction to the basic core competencies and practical skills required of a "generalist" development practitioner and serves as the foundation course for the curriculum. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the interconnectedness of natural sciences and engineering, social science, health sciences, and management, especially as they relate to communities

June 5 to June 8, 2017 (Monday - Thursday), 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Instructor:  Rosemary Caron 
CRN: 70838 
Credits: 3
An analysis of the public process, the development of public health policy in developing countries, and a discussion of specific public health policy issues with cross-country comparisons. This course begins with an analytical framework for analyzing a public health system and process. It is followed by a general introduction to effective health policies in developing countries with examples of specific policies and programs that have been effective. 

Saturday , June 3, 2017  8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
June 19 to June 22, 2017 (Monday - Thursday) 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Instructors:  Sanjeev Sharma and William Maddocks
CRN: 70188
Credits: 3
Combines theory and practical information for students to learn traditional and contemporary organizational and leadership theories and apply them to their experience in organizations particularly non-profit institutions, non-governmental organizations. The course will focus on personal and inter-personal development such as self-awareness, stress and problem solving, interpersonal skills such as supportive communication, power and influence, motivation and conflict management: group skills such as delegation and team building; and leadership. Permission required. 

Saturday , June 3, 2017  8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
June 19 to June 22, 2017 (Monday - Thursday) 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Instructor:  William Maddocks
CRN: 70837
Credits: 2
Leadership and Development emphasizes issues relevant to managing organizations in diverse cultural, socio-economic and political settings. Topics on board governance, resource development, organizational options and communication skills such as marketing, public relations, organizing and conducting meetings will be explored. Permission required. 

June 5 to June 8, 2017 (Monday - Thursday), 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Instructor:  Michael Swack
CRN: 70839
Credits: 3
This course examines the problems faced by development practitioners in financing development activities. The course first focuses on financial markets and the financial needs of development projects and ventures. It will then look at the institutional structures capable of providing development capital in appropriate ways for various development projects. In evaluating institutional structures we focus on a wide variety of institutional management issues including risk assessment, non-traditional underwriting standards, interest rate structure, portfolio management and managing loan delinquency. The final sessions of the course focus on the critical policy issues in the field of development finance. Permission required. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:10 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Instructor:  Shaleen Cassiily
CRN: 70041
Credits: 4
To assume leadership roles, beginning teachers need to develop an informed understanding of how they can operate effectively as decision-makers and agents of change within educational institutions. Such understanding entails knowledge of the politics, history, organization, and function of schools from a variety of viewpoints: historical, political, and cross-cultural. This course focuses on the structure of public education, on the nature of educational change, and the teacher's role in the change process. 

Online
Instructor:  Joseph Onosko
CRN: 70428
Credits: 4
Emphasizes the development of understandings, dispositions, and skills necessary to effectively participate in P-12 reform discussion and decision-making. The course focuses on foundational issues related to a) the legitimacy of public education, b) accountability-based national reform efforts, and c) the goals and content of school curricula. This on-line course is required for the M.Ed. in Educational Studies or elective for other degrees. 

May 22 to June 6, 2017 (Monday - Friday), 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Instructor:  Michael Routhier
CRN: 70247 
Credits: 4

This course teaches concepts and applied techniques of Geographic Information System tools and technologies to solve real world Geospatial Science problems across multiple disciplines. Technical topics covered include geospatial data collection, quality, conversion, management, analysis, visualization, and dissemination. Students hands-on-lab and independent exercises use the latest version of ArcGIS software. Development and implementation of a project proposal and an independent project are completed by students to forward individual interests. GSS 805 - There will be an hour lunch break.

Online
Instructor:  Erin Sharp
CRN: 70567
Credits: 4
Investigations of physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Particular attention to various social practices, policies, and programs that affect sexual attitudes and behaviors. 

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 9:10 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 
Instructor:  Katherine Abbot
CRN: 70094
Credits: 4
The idea of justice is central to social, political, and legal theory. Considerations of justice are appealed to in assessing the legitimacy of governments, the fair distributions of goods and opportunities both with nation-states and globally, and to address specific social concerns such as racial or gender discrimination or access to health care. Course examines both historical sources and contemporary debates about the nature of justice. 

Online
Instructor:  Joanne Samuels
CRN: 70093
Credits: 3
Emphasizes identification of emerging issues that have an impact on the health care system and nursing in providing leadership to address these issues. Students analyze problems and process solutions from a nursing perspective with reasoned approach to their resolution

Mondays and Wednesdays 5:31 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pandora Building 531
Instructor:  David Laflamme
CRN: 70913
Credits: 3 
An introduction to program evaluation as it relates to public health practice and research, primarily in the United States. Public health-specific examples are presented throughout the course. Includes discussion of striking a balance between scientific rigor and the practicalities often faced by program evaluators. 
Manchester Campus

Mondays and Wednesdays 5:31 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pandora Building 531
Instructor:  Karla Armenti
CRN: 70915
Credits: 3 
Overview of occupational safety and health policy in the U.S. Focus on the legal context, especially on OSHA, and provides an analytical framework for examining the role of social, economic, and political factors in the recognition and control of occupational hazards. Some attention to the more technical aspects of this field (e.g., industrial hygiene, ergonomics, general health and safety); emphasis on understanding current occupational health and safety policies and controversies. 
Manchester Campus

Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pandora Building 142
Instructor:  Terry Knowles
CRN: 70918
Credits: 3 
Identification, analysis, evaluation and application of effective communication and negotiation skills. Course will include case studies, and simulation/role-playing exercises. 
Manchester Campus

Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pandora Building  142
Instructor:  Tama Andrews
CRN: 70922
Credits: 3 
New Hampshire is a small state in terms of size and population – but its government and politics are as complex, influential, and intriguing as those of the largest states in the US. This course will focus on how and why NH does what it does, and will cover the development and structure of NH’s government and institutions; the influence of politics on and the ever-changing political dynamics of the state; and how these elements shape and determine NH public policy. Several guest speakers will provide in-depth knowledge of and perspective on specific topics. The course is open to all MPA, MBA, MPH, and other graduate level students who wish to learn more about this state where they live and work.
Manchester Campus

Fridays  6:01 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Pandora Building 302
Saturdays 9:01 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. | Pandora Building 302

Instructor:  Brian Miller
CRN: 70928
Credits: 3 
This course focuses on the science of addictions and co-occurring disorders and how myths and beliefs effect policy, programming and practice. Students get the oppprtunity to explore cultural myths, beliefs, stigma and prejudices regarding addictions (alcohol, illicit drugs, prescription drugs, as well as eating disorders, tobacco, and gambling), and co-occurring disorders that becomes national and state policy and programming. 
Manchester Campus

Instructor: Rachel Campagna
Special topics; may be repeated.

Prereq: consent of adviser and instructor.
T
uesdays 5:40 p.m. to 9:15 p.m

Instructor: Kevin Gardner
Course begins with exploration of the precept that we live in, and must design engineering works for, a world with a finite supply of natural resources and with limited life support capacity. Tools for sustainability engineering are the major focus of the course, which include life cycle, analysis and life cycle impact analysis, the metrics and mass and energy flow analyses used in the field of industrial ecology, and environmental management systems. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:40 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Instructors: Sanjeev Sharma, Robrecht Vanrijkel
Budgeting, goal setting, financial planning, and financial analysis for development organizations.
(DPP 905.1BB) 100% online; no campus visits required.

Online

Instructor: Emilie Reagan
In this course, we examine educational assessment within three different paradigms. First we study the bases for assessment. Next we learn how one designs and administers assessment tasks within the classroom setting. Finally, we examine how one should interpret and utilize the results from standardized tests. We work to become intelligent readers, critics, and consumers of educational assessments. The topics covered in this course are relevant to several other fields including (but not limited to) psychology, social work, familty studies, and nonprofit management. 

Tuesdays 4:10 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Instructor: Todd DeMitchell
Analysis of current federal and state policies affecting students with disabilities. Focus on Section 504 and IDEA. The role of policy making and constitutional and ethical issues discussed. (EDUC 951.01)

This is a hybrid course with face-to-face meetings: 9/1, 9/15, 9/29, 10/27, 11/17, 12/1 (with online activities) 4:10 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 

Instructor: Todd DeMitchell

Negotiations are a fact of life in an environment that has scarce resources.  Teachers, students, and administrators are involved in negotiating for variety items and over various issues.  Collective bargaining is the codified aspect of bargaining between legally recognized parties. In this course, students will gain a working knowledge of the collective bargaining law in New Hampshire, applicable case law, and PELRB rulings. They will learn the history of collective bargaining in the United States and how that history has helped to determine the present state of public sector labor relations.  The students will learn the role that collective bargaining and labor relations play in the organization and administration of schools.  And, finally, students will gain skill in bargaining and analyzing contracts.

Manchester
Saturdays 8:01 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 

Investigations of physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Particular attention to various social practices, policies, and programs that affect sexual attitudes and behaviors. 

Fridays 9:10 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Instructor: Tyler Jamison
Explores the intersection of race, class, and gender in family life in the United States. Theory, research and other relevant literature are used to examine the variety of family configurations in our society today and the diverse experiences that families have as the result of existing social, political, and economic institutions. The strengths of various family types are considered, as well as the particular challenges these families may encounter in contemporary society.

Prereq: permission. 
Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:10 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Instructor: Catherine Berube
This course is designed to familiarize students with the specialized laws and adjudicative systems that govern children, adolescents, and families and reflect society's effort to balance competing interests and goals. It provides the chance to explore laws and processes that affect children and adolescents as they interact with their caregivers, families, and society at large. 

Prereq: permission. 
Mondays 5:10 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Instructor: Catherine Berube
Exploration of laws that affect families as members interact with each other and with society in general. Prereq: management and decision making; family relations; and permission. 

Tuesdays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Instructor: Janet Polasky
With the November 2016 election as our beginning point, we will explore the topics of women in politics and political takes on gender. Does it matter that our political institutions are not gender balanced? How do we ensure all women the enjoyment of their human rights? How do gender questions play out in international development? We will read political philosophy, watch plays, search newspapers from the eighteenth century to the present, and ask lots of questions, of the present (about the role of gender in our presidential election and its coverage or the wearing of headscarves in French schools) and the past (Why did women march from Paris to Versailles on a rainy October afternoon in 1789 demanding bread and then return home the next evening with the king? Or Why did German newspapers commemorate the Socialist Rosa Luxemburg as the last heroic man still alive at the end of the First World War?). This class will draw students from diverse backgrounds, including history, political science, women’s studies, llc, engineering, nursing, English, sociology…and build a class based on the varied experiences of the students.

Thursdays 9:40 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. 

Instructor: Kurk Dorsey
The history of American diplomacy from the colonial era to the present, with the dividing point at 1900.  The focus will be on both the foreign and domestic influences that shaped American diplomacy.  

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays  9:10 a.m. to  10:00 a.m.

Instructor: Prashant Mittal
This course introduces students to the field of health analytics and data science. It expands upon introductory statistical and data manipulation methods to include data mining, predictive analytics, cluster analysis, trend and pattern recognition, and data visualization. It couples data skills with interpretive and communication skills. Students will also be exposed to basic statistical programming. There will be a graduate component of the course (812) where students will work on advanced concepts and complete a separate culminating project.

Prereq: permission.
Mondays and Wednesdays 2:10 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Instructor: Katherine Abbott
Provides students with an introduction to Justice Studies and its faculty. Interdisciplinary study of informal and formal social organization and conflict resolution. Emphasis on law in practice and how individuals operate within and against the system of law. Topics include social order, crime and punishment, security and surveillance, and sharing/assessing risk.

Fridays 10:40 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.  

Instructor: Robert Dunn
This course is designed as a seminar to introduce students to the legislative process and the role of lawyers in legislative advocacy and policymaking. The course will offer students a fundamental overview of the processes and steps for the enactment of legislation, the manner in which legislative texts and legislative history are important to lawyers and the courts, and the connection between lawyers, legislation and the creation of public policy. In addition, students will be directly exposed to lawmaking in action by attending legislative hearings at the NH State House, meeting with state legislators, and interacting with lobbyists who advocate before the state legislature. Through practical exercises, students will develop skills in conducting policy analysis as background for lawmaking, drafting written testimony, and making oral presentations to legislative committees. This class is particularly appropriate for students who want to enhance their exposure to lawyering for social justice. Eligibility: Open to all except 1Ls and students who are current or former members of the NH General Court. Course format: seminar. Grading: class prep. and participation, 30%; research paper, 30%; other (see syllabus), 40%. This course may be taken for an S/U grade.

UNH Law School - Concord
Mondays 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.  

Instructor: Philip Ramsey
This course provides a solid grounding in modern applications of statistics to a wide range of disciplines by providing an overview of the fundamental concepts of statistical inference and analysis, including t-tests and confidence intervals. Additional topics include: ANOVA, multiple linear regression, analysis of cross classified categorical data, logistic regression, nonparameteric statistics and data mining using CART. The use of statistical software, such as JMP. S PLUS, or R, is fully integrated into the course.

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 11:10 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Instructor: Haiving Wang
Statistical methods for the analysis of relationships between response and input variables: simple linear regression, multiple regression analysis, residual analysis model selection, multi-collinearity, nonlinear curve fitting, categorical predictors, introduction to analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, examination of validity of underlying assumptions, logistic regression analysis. Emphasizes real applications with use of statistical software. Prereq: basic introductory statistics.

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 8:10 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.

Instructor: John Carroll
Increasingly fundamental philosophical questions, including spiritual values questions, are posited concerning the ecological/environmental challenge of our time, its causes, and its resolution. Examination of these questions, put forth with ethics and values approaches. Students work to develop responses to both problem identification and resolution.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:40 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Instructor: Rosemary Caron
The focus of this course is on the pattern of services in the United States and on the structure and function of their component parts. It examines the impact on the system of a wide range of external factors including social, political, economic, professional, legal, and technological forces.

Manchester
Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 

Instructor: Philip Alexakos
This course offers a general introduction to the ecological basis of health and disease. It applies the principles and framework of ecosystems to human health problems associated with environmental hazards, including toxic and infectious agents that contaminate our air, water, food, the work place and other special environments. Links between environmental and occupational health effects will be explored within the public health model. Policy required for regulation and alternative strategies for prevention will be discussed.

Manchester
Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Instructor:  Semra Aytur
An analysis of the public policy process, the development of public health policy in the United States, and a discussion of specific public health policy issues with international comparisons. This course begins with an analytical framework for analyzing the American political system and process. It is followed by a general introduction to health policy in the United States with examples of specific policies and programs. Students will be asked to examine specific public health policy in-depth.

Manchester
Tuesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Instructor: Richard Aliano
Impact of judicial decisions on public policy and influences on judicial decision making at the federal, state, and local levels. 

Mondays 3:10 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

Instructor: Paul Dann
Exploration of the major theoretical approaches to leadership, including students' and others' leadership skills, styles, roles, and practices. Students will refine their own conceptual and practical approaches to leadership in a variety of settings.

Manchester
Tuesdays 6:01 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Instructor: Alynna Lyon
This course is about cooperation at the international level. With a focus on international organizations, we examine what roles international institutions (both IGOs and NGOs) play in global governance and their effects in various issue areas. We examine their historical origins, functions, and the international and domestic political forces that impact their effectiveness. The course also considers the role of international organizations on world order including conflict resolution, peacekeeping, development, and human rights. 

Wednesdays 3:10 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

Instructor: Virginia Lever
Advanced analysis and individual research, including opportunities for direct observation of governmental administration.

Oct 19-Dec 14, Additional 4-hr session TBA
Wednesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. 

Instructor: Melvin Dubnick
Through the use of case studies, analysis and assessment of legal, institutional, social, political, and economic settings within public and non-profit sectors.

Online 

Instructor: Pamela Neville
Examination of the administration, politics, and strategies of effective public human resource management.

Manchester, Aug 24-Oct 12, Additional 4-hour session required
Wednesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. 

Instructor:  Curt Grimm, Resources from Spitfire Strategies
This course explores how to develop and implement strategies that drive policy change. Students will learn how to analyze various approaches to changing policy, and then evaluate the most viable option to use within a set of circumstances: overall context, timing, and climate for change. Students also will review different influence models, discuss which ones work best in varying situations, and identify how influence models connect to policy campaigns. They will better understand campaigns by reviewing current campaigns and learning the central elements of a successful campaign to change public policy. Finally, students will choose their own campaign adventures and create their own campaign plans for a relevant policy issue.

Tuesdays 2:10 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
In class and online 

Instructor:  Lawrence Hamilton
This course will give hands-on experience with the complete process of designing, collecting, analyzing, and writing about survey research. We will work with several recent, high-quality, and professionally conducted surveys.

Tuesdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Instructor: Kim Kelsey
Major social work policy and program questions in the field of child welfare introduced. The relationship between child welfare and the rest of the social work profession analyzed. Various types of child welfare services, some aspects of social and child welfare policy studied, as well as current research and practice issues in child welfare services. 

Wednesdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Instructor:  Patrick Shannon
The aim of this course is to prepare students to act as informed human service professionals through a better understanding of social problems, social welfare policy, and the American social welfare system. Students are provided with an overview of the origins and development of social welfare policy in the United States, the political processes in our federal and state systems, and the values and ethics that shape our present social welfare system. The course also helps students examine ways they can influence policy formulation while advocating for human rights and social/economic justice. 

Tuesdays 10:10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Instructor: Sharon Murphy
This course examines intimate partner violence or domestic violence from its historical roots to the present. In accordance with a historical and contextual approach, we examine theories that explain and describe the phenomenon, research that attempts to define it, as well as social policies, social movements, and intervention from a social work perspective. Intimate partner violence (IPV) also known as domestic violence, cuts across racial, ethnic, and class boundaries and impedes victim's well-being and social participation. IPV includes many physical assault, sexual assualt, emotional, verbal, and economic abuse and coercive control.

Wednesdays 11:40 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Durham Courses

Fridays 10:10 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. | Kendall 106 
Instructor: TBD 
CRN: 56981 
Credits: 3

Designed to equip students with the skills they will need as practitioners to advance public policy goals through the development and execution of responsive communications strategy. Students will gain an understanding of the media landscape and trends in journalism; how to identify media opportunities and target audiences; how to write to successfully communicate to various audiences; and basic skills to prepare for and give effective interviews to communicate policy messages.

  • Non-MPP students may enroll by permission only.
  • See instructor for permission then sign up in the dept office before registering through WEBCAT.

Wednesdays 5:40 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Paul College 205 
Instructor: Carole Barnett 
CRN: 55447 
Credits: 3

The goal of this cross-disciplinary course is to develop students' deep understanding of the dynamic, mutually reinforcing power of leadership follower relations in modern organizations - including both toxic and beneficial processes and outcomes. Readings draw on the literatures from business, social sciences, and philosophy to illuminate the complexities of leading in 21st century corporations, public service organizations, institutions of higher learning, and government agencies. A diverse cross-section of students from doctoral and master level programs across all UNH schools, colleges, and departments participate in the course in order to most broadly examine how the leader-follower relationship can succeed or fail in its pursuit of organizational strategies and objectives. Prereq: permission. (contact Susan Browning, MBA Program Coordinator for permission: Susan.Browning@unh.edu )

Tuesdays or Thursdays 6:10 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. | Kingsbury N129 
Instructor: Michael Routhier 
CRN: 57172 
Credits: 4

Advanced or specialized topics not normally covered in regular course offerings. May be repeated, but not in duplicate areas. Prereq: permission. 

Mondays and Wednesdays 3:40 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. | Murkland G17 
Instructor: Michael Swack
CRN: 57249
Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide the participant with an overall understanding of the microfinance institutions including management, planning and monitoring strategies, tools, and systems. Sessions will seek to develop skills and capacity to examine various areas, such as competition, expansion, product development, service delivery and human resource, marketing, and information management systems. Prereq: Project Design. 

Mondays and Wednesdays 12:40 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. | Paul College Business and Economics 235
Instructor: Michael Swack
CRN: 57248
Credits: 3

This course examines innovative organizations that are created to improve people's lives and that contribute to improved social, economic and environmental conditions. These organizations adapt various aspects of the market model emphasizing both financial vaibility and social (including environmental) goals - measuring achievement in all of the areas. Social enterprises are often launched to address problems where government, the private sector and the traditional non-profit sector fail to provide a public good. The course emphasis is on how such organizations are started, the business models they develop, and how they are sustained. We will have a wide range of social entrepreneurs presenting in the class. Permission required. 

EDUC 967 (01) - School Law

Saturdays 8:10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. | Morrill 103 
Instructor: Todd DeMitchell
CRN: 56638
Credits: 4

Relationship of law to public education. Emphasis on federal constitution, New Hampshire statutes, and case law related to public interests served by elementary and secondary education. Special topics: church-state relationship, due process, desegregation, teacher employment, discrimination, negotiations, student rights, tort liability. 

Mondays and Wednesdays  2:10 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. | Horton 201 
Instructor: Ellen Fitzpatrick
CRN: 56608
Credits: 4

Influential thinkers and ideas have shaped American politics, society, economy, and culture since the Civil War. Among the topics explored are American Victorianism, Social Darwinism, Pragmatism, Modernism and its opponents, gender and identity politics and post modernism. Mark Twain, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Thorstein Veblen, W.E.B. Dubois, John Dewey, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Hannah Arendt, Thomas Kuhn, Malcolm X, Susan Sontag and William F. Buckley Jr. will be among the thinkers explored. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. | Horton 304 
Instructor: Julia Rodriguez
CRN: 54312
Credits: 4

This course provides a close examination of major topics in twentieth-century Latin American history, seen especially through the lens of first-person narrative and everyday life experiences. Topics examined include revolutions, dictatorship, popular culture, social movements, drugs, gangs, and migration. Recurring themes that run throughout the course include inequality, violence, human rights, social movements, identity, globalization, and the environment. Sources include first person accounts, memoirs, novels, and films, in addition to selected scholarly publications. Our goal is to understand some of the major transitions in Latin America in the last hundred years, and to further engage our curiosity about the region by delving into the details of some individual lives and how they were intertwined with larger events and processes.
Attributes:
 Online with some campus visits, EUNH 

Thursdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. | Horton 422
Instructor: Jason Sokol
CRN: 55471
Credits: 4

In 1903, W.E.B. Du Bois famously wrote that “the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line.” This seminar examines major works on race in twentieth-century America. It focuses most closely (but not exclusively) on the African American experience. This course places particular emphasis on the modern civil rights struggle, its origins, and the movement’s evolving legacy. We read classic texts as well as the most recent scholarship. We will also explore the nature of historical inquiry itself, modes of interpretation, and different approaches to writing history – from monographs and biographies to works of narrative history.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:40 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall 106
Instructor: Erin Sharp
CRN: 55226
Credits: 4

Investigations of physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Particular attention to various social practices, policies, and programs that affect sexual attitudes and behaviors. 

Mondays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall 106
Instructor: Catherine Berube
CRN: 55228
Credits: 4

This course is designed to familiarize students with the specialized laws and adjudicative systems that govern children, adolescents and families and reflect society's effort to balance competing interests and goals. It provides the chance to explore laws and processes that affect children and adolescents as they interact with their caregivers, families and society at large; permission. 

Tuesdays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall 106
Instructor: Catherine Berube
CRN: 55229
Credits: 4

Exploration of laws that affect families as members interact with each other and with society in general. Prereq: management and decision making; family relations; and permission. 

Fridays 10:40 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. | Huddleston G10
Instructor: TBD
CRN: 53450
Credits: 4

New or specialized courses are presented under this listing. Staff present material not normally covered by the course offerings. Cross-listed courses. May be repeated but not duplicate content. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:10 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. | Spaulding Life Science 230 
Instructor: John Carroll
CRN: 55427
Credits: 4

Deeper more fundamental philosophical questions, including spiritual values questions, are being asked concerning the ecological/environmental challenge of our time; its causes and resolution. Aspects of this challenge--environmental education, energy, food, agriculture, and natural resources--analyzed with ethics and values approaches. Students develop ways of responding to problem identification and resolution.

Mondays 6:10 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | James G46
Instructor: John Coon
CRN: 51216
Credits: 3

Federal and state environmental statutory and administrative law, its application, strengths and weaknesses, and options for future amendment.

Mondays and Wednesdays 12:10 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. | James 140
Instructor: Catherine Ashcraft
CRN: 51491
Credits: 4
Special Fees: $25.00

Theories and practices of environmental dispute settlement. Roles of public, non-governmental and governmental organizations. Effectiveness of public participation initiatives in influencing public policy decisions and/or resolving environmental conflicts. Alternative approaches to consensus (policy dialogues, joint problem solving; strategic planning; negotiation, mediation) as well as litigation. Specific cases are critiqued and evaluated; conflict resolution skills are developed. Students observe and/or participate in ongoing local decision processes. Prereq: permission. Lab. Special fee. See instructor for permission then sign up in the dept office before registering through WEBCAT.

Tuesdays and Thursdays  9:40 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. | Rudman 110 
Thursdays 8:10 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. | Rudman 110
Instructor: Joanne Burke
CRN: 54052
Credits: 4

Food system structure and function from a coupled human and natural systems perspective. Topics include: an exploration of using natural resources to meet growing population demands; conflicting views on meeting food and nutrition requirements; impacts of increased stress on natural resources; inequities and discrimination in the food system; impact of dietary guidelines on the environment. Study of diverse human and natural system interactions are integrated to understand issues in food system sustainability. You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.

Tuesdays 3:10 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Horton 327 
Instructor: Lawrence Reardon
CRN: 56676
Credits: 3

This course has been designed to introduce advanced undergraduates and graduate students to the current theoretical discussions in international political economy. The course analyzes the development of current international ecomonic regimes, as well as look at systemic theories (interdependence, hegemonic stability), domestic determinants (bureaucratic, interest group) and decision-making theories (rational choice). By monitoring current economic and political news, students are challenged to apply these ideas to explain the current problems in political economy. 

Mondays 3:10 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Horton 327 
Instructor: Tama Andrews
CRN: 52912
Credits: 3

What is American federalism? What is the meaning of the term intergovernmental relations? Which level of government (national, state, local) should have primary responsibility for specific policy areas? Who is responsible? Who should pay and how? Who has and who should have influence in policymaking and service delivery?  What are the differences between national, state and local government responsibilities and service delivery? These questions will be part of our exploration of federalism and intergovernmental relations.

The course is designed to familiarize students with major aspects of federalism and intergovernmental relations (IGR), including conceptual/historical foundations, theoretical approaches, and contemporary issues, through readings, and discussions. By the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of historic and current issues involving federalism and IGR,  will have a better comprehension of why all levels of American government do what they do (or don't) and how government attempts to respond to its citizens.

Wednesdays 3:10 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Horton 327 
Instructor: Andrew Smith
CRN: 56680
Credits: 3

Tuesdays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Horton 327 
Instructor: Carolyn Arcand
CRN: 56822
Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course will incorporate political science, economics, history, sociology, and law to examine the current economic status of women, and to analyze the impact of public policy and public programs on women’s economic roles. Attention will be paid to theories of difference in women’s and men’s occupational and earnings outcomes, as well as causes of difference in economic outcomes between women. Students will explore the impact of these differences through thoughtful examination, discussion, interpretation, and presentation on policies and programs that impact women’s working lives.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:40 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. | Rudman G89
Instructor: Robert Robertson
CRN: 55596
Credits: 4

A cross-disciplinary perspective on the issues, problems, and methods of Social Impact Assessment (SIA). The analytic approach and theoretical framework provided applied to the assessment of very diverse events--changes in the natural environment, local economy, or dominant technology. SIA is required of most U.S. and Canadian federal and state sponsored projects that come under the National Environmental Protection Act, to include tourism, park and recreation development, highways, reservoirs, timber production, hazardous waste disposal, as well as policy issues. SIA is also required for all projects funded by international donor agencies such as USIA, the World Bank, and private international development agencies. 

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 1:10 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. | James G54
Instructor: John Halstead
CRN: 56722
Credits: 4

Concepts and methods of delineating regional economies, methods of measuring activity, regional development, and public policies. Emphasis on empirical research studies. Prereq: intermediate economy theory or permission. 

Mondays 12:40 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. | McConnell 302
Instructor: James Tucker
CRN: 54370
Credits: 4
Analysis of the social conditions associated with the major forms of conflict management in human societies: discipline, rebellion, vengeance, negotiation, mediation, law, therapy, supernaturalism, and avoidance. 
Mondays 3:40 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Pettee G02
Instructor: TBD
CRN: 50525
Credits: 3
In this course, students learn about behavior and development and its context across the life cycle from a macro systems perspective. The macrosystems that impact individual development are examined. Societal forces that are often invisible shape and profoundly alter life experiences of larger numbers of people. HSBE II pays special attention to social relationships that promote welfare of some while limiting opportunities and choices for others. the semester explores the influence of class, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, age, sexual orientation, and other aspects of diversity on development and behavior of larger systems. 
Tuesdays 3:40 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall G02 
Instructor: Bo Rin Kim 
CRN: 50545
Credits: 3

In this course, students learn about behavior and development and its context across the life cycle from a macro systems perspective. The macrosystems that impact individual development are examined. Societal forces that are often invisible shape and profoundly alter life experiences of larger numbers of people. HSBE II pays special attention to social relationships that promote welfare of some while limiting opportunities and choices for others. the semester explores the influence of class, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, age, sexual orientation, and other aspects of diversity on development and behavior of larger systems. 

Mondays 1:10 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. | Pettee Hall G13
Instructor: Richard Lusenhop
CRN: 51837
Credits: 3

This course is an extension of Social Welfare Policy I. Both courses view social welfare policy as the framework in which social work services are developed and delivered. That is, policies provide the context for direct practice. Social Welfare Policy II examines policy analysis as a process with underlying theory and methodology. This process emphasizes political advocacy in the pursuit of human rights, and social and economic justice. The course integrates policy and practice, in part, through student research and analysis of specific social problems and client populations relevant to the student's volunteer, work, and/or field internship experience.

  • Prereq: SW 820. 
Tuesdays 6:10 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pettee Hall G02 
Instructor: Patrick Shannon
CRN: 51838
Credits: 3

This course is an extension of Social Welfare Policy I. Both courses view social welfare policy as the framework in which social work services are developed and delivered. That is, policies provide the context for direct practice. Social Welfare Policy II examines policy analysis as a process with underlying theory and methodology. This process emphasizes political advocacy in the pursuit of human rights, and social and economic justice. The course integrates policy and practice, in part, through student research and analysis of specific social problems and client populations relevant to the student's volunteer, work, and/or field internship experience. 

  • Prereq: SW 820. 
Tuesdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. | McConnell 302
Instructor: Michele Dillon
CRN: 56703
Credits: 4

This course is designed to cover major methodological and practical issues in the field of evaluation research, including the definition and meaning of evaluation; the purposes of evaluation; the design and conduct of evaluation studies; evidence-based policy writing; and the uses of evaluation results. This is an advanced undergraduate-level and graduate-level course. The prerequisite for the course is successful coursework in methods of research and statistical analysis. 

Thursdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. | McConnell 302 
Instructor: Rebecca Glauber
CRN: 56704
Credits: 4

Why are some jobs more dangerous or less rewarding than others? How do people choose their jobs? How does work shape our health, emotional well-being, and sense of self? How has the structure of work changed over the past decades? And how are race, class, and gender inequalities produced and reproduced in the workplace? This course will consider these important questions and focus on three broad themes: deindustrialization and economic restructuring, service work and the labor process, and the production and reproduction of structural inequalities in the workplace. Students will have a chance to complete original research in this course. The course enrolls advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

Manchester Courses

Mondays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Pandora Building
Instructor: Carolyn Arcand
CRN: 56972
Credits: 3

Examines the legal rules governing regulatory agencies, in the U.S. Topics include regulatory adjudication and rulemaking, legislative and executive control over administrative agencies, judicial review and public participation. Course examines federal and state levels of government. 

Thursdays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Pandora Building
Instructor: Paul Dann
CRN: 57085
Credits: 3

Introduction to key actors, theories and concepts in the fields of organizational theory and behavior. 

Wednesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: Carolyn Arcand 
CRN: 56977
Credits: 3
 

Analysis, goal setting, and strategic planning in a governmental setting, with particular emphasis on budgetary processes as a means for controlling policy effectiveness.

Additional 4-hour session required

POLT 918 (M1) - Non-Profit Management

Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: Terry Knowles
CRN: 56978
Credits: 3

Introduction to governance and management in the non-profit sector: finance, development, personnel management, strategic planning, and risk management.
Additional 4-hour session required

Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: Roy Parrish, Sharon McDonnell
CRN: 56961
Credits: 3

Exploration of factors underlying the distribution and determinants of states of health in various human populations. Emphasis is placed on investigative techniques, epidemiologic methodology, and disease prevention. Unlike other core courses in the MPH Program which are 8 weeks in length, this course is 16 weeks in length. Meets in class with synchronous online meetings

Tuesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. | Pandora Building, P368
Instructor: Ann-Marie Matteucci
CRN: 56960
Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the principles of biostatistics. Students learn through classroom instruction, lab instruction and exercises, a variety of statistical methods in public health. Students review measures of central tendency, rates, and standardization, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, comparisons, and simple, multiple and logistic regression techniques. Unlike other core courses in the MPH Program which are 8 weeks in length, this course is 16 weeks in length. 

Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: John Martin
CRN: 56977
Credits: 3
 

This course seeks to provide the legal basis for public health that is needed to effectively practice public health, especially with respect to understanding and enforcing compliance with public health regulations, and managing public health programs and organizations. The course introduces the core elements of law, legal practice and reasoning, and illustrates their application and use in public health. 

Tuesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: TBD
CRN: 56965
Credits: 3
 

Analysis, goal setting, and strategic planning in a governmental setting, with particular emphasis on budgetary processes as a means for controlling policy effectiveness.

Additional 4-hour session required

Wednesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: Carolyn Arcand 
CRN: 56977
Credits: 3
 

Overview of relationships between where people live, work, learn and play (built environment) and their health. Promotes an interdisciplinary approach to address chronic public health problems such as heart disease, obesity and depression, as well as tackling environmental issues.

Meets in class and online

 

 

Online Courses

Instructor: Dwight McNeill
CRN: 57194
Credits: 3

This on-line course provides students with a foundation in population health principles, strategies and analytics. The instructional methodologies include lectures, multiple media resources, individual assignments, and participation in on-line group forums. The course is delivered in 8 modules. Assessments of student progress are made through quizzes, exams, an individual project, and engagement and contributions to the classes.

Instructors: Sanjeev Sharma, Jill Fitzsimmons
CRN: 53870
Credits: 3

This course provides the practitioner with tools of economic analysis that are necessary for effective development practice. Drawing upon principles of macroeconomics, the course explores how markets, property rights, political institutions, government policies, environmental conditions and cultural values interact to produce development outcomes. 

Instructor: Jade Lee
CRN: 55501
Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to research methods in education and the social sciences. Issues from a wide variety of perspectives on research are covered, including the formal procedures employed by experimental psychologists, qualitative perspectives, and techniques used by researchers involved in exploratory investigations in schools and other real-life settings. The design and implementation of research studies is contextualized in current educational and social science issues. 

Instructor: Todd DeMitchell
CRN: 55080
Credits: 4

Our public schools play a vital role in our society. What shall be taught and who shall teach our children are perennial questions. This course explores how the law impacts the educational lives of students and teachers, including issues of church-state relations, free speech, dress codes, and search and seizure. (Also offered as JUST 867.) 

Instructor: Joseph Onosko 
CRN: 55078
Credits: 4 

Emphasizes the development of understandings, dispositions, and skills necessary to effectively participate in P-12 reform discussion and decision-making. The course focuses on foundational issues related to a) the legitimacy of public education, b) accountability-based national reform efforts, and c) the goals and content of school curricula. This on-line course is required for the M.Ed. in Educational Studies or elective for other degrees. 

Instructor: TBD
CRN: TBD
Credits: 4 

Locational crowdsourcing, where users contribute geographic data, is one of the most exciting new areas of data generation and delivery of geographic information in response to emerging situations. In this course we will use crowdsourcing to collect geographic information and analyze it using technology and applications that can be applied anywhere. Course topics and real-world examples incorporate concepts from geography, history, anthropology, sociology, planning, information science, and disaster management. This course will be a hands-on and lab-based to introduce students to the concepts of crowdsourced data acquisition and teach them how to capture and use data.​

Instructor: James Lewis
CRN: 55878 
Credits: 3 

The course introduces students to the evolution, organization and structure of the health services industry. The course examine key components, including patients, providers, payers and suppliers, as well as assessing major issues confronting the system such as population health, evolving reimbursement models, health reform, assessment of quality and costs, epidemiological and demographic imperatives, and changing technology. 

Instructor: Melvin Dubnick 
CRN: 56823
Credits: 3 

Advanced analysis and individual research, including opportunities for direct observation of governmental administration. 

Instructor: Patricia Cox
CRN: 56869
Credits: 3 

In this course, students learn about behavior and development and its context across the life cycle from a macro systems perspective. The macrosystems that impact individual development are examined. Societal forces that are often invisible shape and profoundly alter life experiences of larger numbers of people. HSBE II pays special attention to social relationships that promote welfare of some while limiting opportunities and choices for others. the semester explores the influence of class, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, age, sexual orientation, and other aspects of diversity on development and behavior of larger systems. 

 

 

 

To learn more about UNH course offerings, please click here. 

Contact

Admissions and General Program Information:
Eileen Sipple Merrigan 
carsey.mpp@unh.edu
603.862.0214