Electives

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Electives

Electives are available in many substantive areas and allow students to create a curriculum enabling them to achieve their career goals. Topics and courses are added on a continuing basis. In addition, independent studies with leading experts can be arranged to match specialized student interests. Students may propose additional electives from other University of New Hampshire departments if they make sense in terms of the student’s interests and academic plan. Discussion with an adviser should inform this choice.

Please click the course title to view elective course descriptions. Electives with an asterisk count toward the advanced core curriculum requirement.

Credits: 3
Impact of judicial decisions on public policy and influences on judicial decision making at the federal, state, and local levels.

Credits: 3
This class provides students with a comprehensive overview of the process for writing proposals for grant funding. Students will learn to research funding opportunities and write the various sections of a funding proposal. Differences in seeking grants from foundation, corporate, and government funders will be explored. In addition to individual projects, the class will work as a group to research, write, and submit a funding proposal for a non-profit or municipal government program.

Credits: 3
This course will explore a major aspect of public management, an advanced management tool that can help managers gain efficiencies and increase accountability. Theoretical foundations and practical applications of performance measurement and management techniques will examine how managers, government and non-profit, might utilize performance measurement to make budgetary decisions and improve organizational performance.

Credits: 3
Policy and program evaluation of federal, state, and local governmental enterprise; focuses on the politics, practices, and methods of evaluative investigation. Evaluation as a technique for providing rational information for budgetary and policy-making decisions.

Credits: 3
Advanced study of powers, politics, political cultures, and constitutional settings of American state and local government.

Credits: 3
This course will familiarize students with federalism and intergovernmental relations including conceptual/historical foundations, theoretical approaches, policy networks, and contemporary issues and challenges. Historic and current issues in federalism, political and policy challenges facing the three levels of government, and government’s efforts to respond to citizens’ needs and demands will be examined. By the end of the course, students will have developed solid comprehension of how intergovernmental relations impact policy decision making and delivery in the public and non-profit sectors.

Credits: 3
Examines the legal rules governing regulatory agencies, in the United States. Topics include regulatory adjudication and rulemaking, legislative and executive control over administrative agencies, judicial review, and public participation. Course examines federal and state levels of government.

Credits: 3
Examination of the role of public opinion in democracy. Research, design, implementation, and analysis of a public opinion survey.

Credits: 3
Exploration of the major theoretical approaches to leadership, including students’ and others’ leadership skills, styles, roles, and practices. Students will refine their own conceptual and practical approaches to leadership in a variety of settings.

Credits: 3
Identification, analysis, evaluation, and application of effective communication and negotiation skills. Course will include case studies and simulation/role-playing exercises.

Credits: 3
The goal of the Security Intelligence Study course is to provide an opportunity for students to apply research and analysis models used by intelligence professionals to a real-world problem. Using unclassified public sources, students research and present an analytical product to help limit risk for a government decision maker. Participants learn about and use publicly available data and intelligence analysis models.

Credits: 3
This course is about cooperation at the international level. With a focus on international organizations, we examine what roles international institutions (both IGOs and NGOs) play in global governance and their effects in various issue areas. We examine their historical origins, functions, and the international and domestic political forces that impact their effectiveness. The course also considers the role of international organizations on world order including conflict resolution, peacekeeping, development, and human rights.

Credits: 3
Explores international/global environmental politics and policy making, multilateral negotiations, the role of science and technology in policy making, state capacity, the making of international law, implementation, and compliance. Other issues include climate control, marine pollution, long-range air pollution, United States leadership in the global political arena, North-South divisions in global politics, environmental justice, sustainable development, and the role of the United Nations and other international organizations.

Credits: 3
Though the use of case studies, analysis, and assessment of legal, institutional, social, political, and economic settings within public and non-profit sectors. Pre-Service.

Credits: 3
Introduction to analytic decision making and planning techniques applicable to public sector management.

Credits: 3
Examination of the administration, politics, and strategies of effective public human resource management.

Credits: 3
Analysis, goal setting, and strategic planning in a governmental setting, with particular emphasis on budgetary processes as a means for controlling policy effectiveness.

Credits: 3
Introduction to governance and management in the non-profit sector: finance, development, personnel management, strategic planning, and risk management.

Contact

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Academic Partnership Coordinator:
Sarah Dorner
carsey.degree@unh.edu
603.862.0214