Community, Environment, and Climate Change

America’s communities are rooted in connections to the land, waters, and forests that comprise the American landscape. Building a sustainable future for our communities requires coping with a complex array of issues that are further complicated by globalization, resource depletion, changing demographics, new land use patterns, and, especially important, climate change. The Carsey School’s interdisciplinary team of policy-minded researchers seeks to address these issues through building knowledge and awareness of the socio-economic conditions, ecosystem changes, and policy opportunities in communities where natural resources play an important role in the local economy. Our work explores the potential of working landscape development strategies to build diverse, resilient communities and local economies. We examine the dynamic interplay of changing social, economic, and environmental factors and the implications for ecologically sustainable economic development policies.

Since 2007, Carsey researchers working with the UNH Survey Center have carried out large-sample telephone surveys, asking questions on environmental, natural resource or science topics, along with how people view present and future conditions in their home communities. Many of these surveys target particular rural regions around the country, ranging from northern New England to eastern Oregon, the Gulf Coast or Alaska. Others have been nationwide. New questions often are tested, and important ones repeated, on the Granite State Poll — a statewide New Hampshire survey conducted four times each year. Learn More 

HIghlights

Meghan Howey being videotaped

Boston 25 News: Rising Sea Level Threatening History Up and Down New England Coast

Boston 25 News: Rising Sea Level Threatening History Up and Down New England Coast

Article
Image of eroding coastline

NHPR: Archaeologists Find Eroding Coastlines Threaten Past as Much as Present

NHPR: Archaeologists Find Eroding Coastlines Threaten Past as Much as Present

Article
image of mountains

Wallowa County Chieftain: First ‘pub talk’ deemed a success

Wallowa County Chieftain: First ‘pub talk’ deemed a success

Article

 

Lawrence Hamilton

Lawrence (Larry) Hamilton is Master in Public Policy faculty, a Carsey Senior Faculty Fellow and professor of sociology at the University of New Hampshire. He has written about statistical methods in articles and books such as Modern Data Analysis (1990), Regression with Graphics (1992), and eight editions of Statistics with Stata (1990–2013), two of which were translated into Chinese. 
Learn More