Serve & Learn

Three photos, from left, of a nonprofit worker, an educator in front of her class, and two nonprofit workers filling boxes of food.

Educational Opportunities for Those Committed to Public Service

The Carsey School of Public Policy's Serve & Learn program offers free and discounted credit-bearing, practitioner-based courses to those who have worked in, or intend to work in, public service activities that have been materially changed by COVID-19. These courses will support them in their work and can jump-start a UNH undergraduate or graduate degree. Public and private sector employment and volunteer work can qualify. This work can be done in any industry, including the Business, Government, and Nonprofit sectors. Registrants should also be residents of New Hampshire. Learn who qualifies?

During the University of New Hampshire’s January term (Dec. 28 – Jan. 22), qualifying individuals can enroll in a free, credit-bearing online course. Available to high school graduates at the undergraduate level and those who have already earned a bachelor’s degree, this 3-credit class aims to bridge the gap between the practical aspects in COVID-19 preparedness, relief, and response efforts, and the theories and skills associated with public engagement, equity, and dialogue in public spaces.

The Carsey School will also be announcing courses in the spring 2021 semester related to this program with more details to follow.
 

Who Qualifies for Serve & Learn?

Qualifying applicants for this free UNH course will be have worked in, or intend to work in, public service activities that have been materially changed by COVID-19. Applicants efforts can be associated with the business, government, or the nonprofit sectors. Qualifying work can range from direct COVID-19 response, such as treating COVID-19 patients, to addressing the economic impact including through social service delivery, to addressing the personal and societal impact such as through counseling, to areas where delivery mechanisms have been impacted such as food programs. Qualifying activities may include work related to outreach and communication, product or service development, service delivery, and many other efforts.

The Carsey School and its Serve & Learn program are strongly committed to diversity, equity and belonging within communities. Carsey’s programs are open to all interested people, and the School welcomes and encourages people who hold all identities – including people of color, women, Indigenous People, people with disabilities, people from the LGBTQIAP+ communities, and many more with historically marginalized identities – to register and join the Serve & Learn program.

The Carsey School and its members believe that when space is created for all different identities, perspectives and life experiences to learn together, a community of belonging is created where all can prosper.

Qualifications:
  1. Be working toward OR have already earned a bachelor’s degree
  2. Been involved in OR expect to be involved in COVID-19 response and preparedness efforts
  3. Be a resident of New Hampshire

Frequently Asked Questions

The Carsey School Serve & Learn program is not limited to healthcare professionals. Applicants can come from any industry or field, as long as they have provided services (or plan to in the future) in response efforts related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Yes. If you expect that you will be involved in providing services in response to the pandemic, you will need to describe the capacity you’ll serve in and the work involved.

During the application process, we’ll ask for a brief description of the role you played in COVID-19 response efforts (or the role you expect to play). We encourage you to provide as much detail as you want in describing this work.

Ready to apply to register? You can find the form here.

Yes. There is both an undergraduate and graduate section of the course being offered.

Nothing – it’s completely free to qualifying students.

Self-paced, online with 3 synchronous sessions.

About the J-Term Course

Course Name: Public Engagement in Communities – Using an Equity Lens as a Reflective Practitioner

Course Description: This online course introduces frameworks and established practices effective for increasing social equity and fostering inclusive participation in decisions and actions that impact people’s lives. Team taught by practitioners and scholars in equity and public engagement, the course is grounded in professional and personally lived experiences from NH Listens work in schools, towns, state, and regional initiatives.

Students should bring their stories too! Students will engage in discussions about their identities, biases, and power within work, learning, and home communities. They will learn about and reflect upon facilitation strategies for guiding challenging conversations, addressing conflict, and building community coalitions across difference.

Important COurse Dates:
 

  • Dec. 15, 2020 – Registration Deadline
  • Dec. 28, 2020 – January term & Course start date
  • Jan. 7, 2021, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. – Synchronous course meeting
  • Jan. 14, 2021, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. – Synchronous course meeting
  • Jan. 21, 2021, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. – Synchronous course meeting

The Carsey School at the University of New Hampshire is nationally recognized for research, policy education, and bringing people together for thoughtful dialogue to address important societal challenges. Carsey publishes research that analyzes complex data tied to current policy issues and grounded in real-world conditions. The School offers three public service master’s degrees: Master in Public Policy, Master of Public Administration, and Master in Community Development. Learn More

About the Instructors

Image of Michele

Michele Holt-Shannon is director and co-founder of New Hampshire Listens at the UNH Carsey School of Public Policy. Her work on and off campus is focused on inclusive civic engagement, community problem-solving, and building coalitions for community initiated change efforts. Learn more

Photo of Carrie Portrie

Dr. Carrie Portrie serves as a program manager with NH Listens. Carrie’s work with NH Listens began in mid-2016 supporting early childhood community engagement and coalition building in eight communities. Learn more

andres mejia

Andres Mejia serves as a program manager with NH Listens. Andres is a member of the University of New Hampshire President’s Commissions on the Status of People of Color, and the University Commission on Community, Equity & Diversity. He serves as a staff advisor for MOS:DEF (Men of Strength, Education and Family), a support group for men of color; the Black Student Union; and the Queer Trans People of color support group. Learn more

A black and white photo showing NH Listens staff member Moises Nunez

Moises Nuñez is a fellow with NH Listens and serves as a Senior Associate with the Great Schools Partnership. He has 20 years of experience in public education and has taught across the northeast in public schools, private independent schools, and universities. Mo has also led and/or designed several alternative education and at-risk youth programs. He was most recently the director of student services and special education at Baxter Academy for Technology and Science, which he helped found. Learn more

About the Spring Term 2021 Courses

Register (registration link coming soon) for these Spring 2021 courses and receive a partial scholarship to attend!

Graduate-level Course

Course Name and Number: Advanced Special Topics – PPOL 897 (equivalent to PPOL 997)

Modality: Online

Course Description: This course will cover the impact of paid and unpaid care work on individuals, families, and the overall economy as well as the history of policymaking that effects the provision of care in the United States. Students will learn a new method of intersectionality-based policy analysis, then use this foundation to explore and evaluate the emergent policy response to care provision in the age of COVID-19.

Instructor: Carolyn Arcand, Lecturer, Carsey School of Public Policy, Education:

  • Ph.D., Public Policy, University of Massachusetts – Boston
  • M.P.A., Public Policy & Management, University of Southern Maine
  • M.S., Public Policy, University of Massachusetts – Boston
  • B.S., Accounting and Entrepreneurship & Emerging Enterprises, Syracuse University

Undergraduate-level Course

Course Name and Number: Research for Political and Policy Action – PS 595

Modality: Online only with live class meetings Mondays, 6 – 7:30 p.m.

Course Description: This course offers students an overview of how the social sciences, and political science in particular, decide which questions to ask and how they go about designing the research projects that will help them to get satisfactory answers to those questions. As we explore these methods of inquiry and analysis, you will undertake your own multi- or mixed-methods research project to try to better understand something that interests or puzzles you. This Writing Intensive course is required of all Public Service & Nonprofit Leadership majors and fulfills the Research Methods requirement for Homeland Security majors, but all students are welcome. No purchase of books required: All materials will be freely available online or through the UNH Library portal.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Instructor: Stephen Pimpare, Principal Lecturer, UNH-Manchester Department of Business & Public Affairs, Education:

  • Ph.D., Political Science, City University of New York
  • B.S., Community & Human Services, State University of New York

Outcomes: By the end of the course, you will be able to do the following:

  • Distinguish “good” research from “bad” research;
  • Interpret simple descriptive and inferential statistics;
  • Evaluate the validity and reliability of various forms of qualitative and quantitative data;
  • Formulate testable and falsifiable hypotheses;
  • Gather the data to test your hypotheses using two tools of research;
  • Situate your findings in the body of scientific knowledge you are contributing to;
  • Communicate your findings clearly and professionally.

Undergraduate-level Course

Course Name and Number: Wicked Problems: Puzzles in Public Policy – PS 500

Modality: Online only with live class meetings Thursdays, 6 – 7:30 p.m.

Course Description: Meaningful change in the US is difficult under the best of circumstances, and it's almost never the best o circumstances. As a result, the richer your understanding of the complex and often irrational US policy-making system, the better the chance that you will be able to understand why certain policies are made (or not made), why they take the form that they do, and how to alter them. No books need to be purchased for this course; All materials will be freely available online or through the UNH Library portal.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Instructor: Stephen Pimpare, Principal Lecturer, UNH-Manchester Department of Business & Public Affairs, Education:

  • Ph.D., Political Science, City University of New York
  • B.S., Community & Human Services, State University of New York

Outcomes: By the end of the course, you will be able to do the following:

  • Define and evaluate the merits of a range of key theories and concepts in public policy, including: policy stages, multiple streams theory, punctuated equilibrium, policy feedback, policy drift, policy diffusion, path dependence, and more.
  • Describe the current shape of federal expenditures and how they have changed over time.
  • Describe US tax policy, explain how and why it has changed over time, and evaluate the consequences as they affect various populations.
  • Describe the current state of policy regarding health care, old age pensions, immigration, and climate; enumerate how they have changed over time; explain why those changes have occurred; and propose practicable paths for future policy innovation and improvement.
  • Create a comprehensive, professional-quality policy analysis and action plan on one national domestic policy problem.

In the process, you should also develop skills and knowledge that will allow you to:

  • Distinguish between reliable and less reliable source of information and analysis on US public policy.
  • Undertake more advanced work in policy analysis, research, and advocacy.
  • Work effectively with colleagues in productive efforts at building intellectual community around constructive peer review and support.
  • Engage more effectively with family, friends, neighbors, and colleagues about issues in contemporary policy that matter and that matter to you.
  • Be a more knowledgeable and active citizen.

Undergraduate-level Course

Course Name and Number: NH Politics in Action – PS 515

Modality: Online only with live class meetings Wednesdays, 6 – 7:30 p.m.

Additional notes: No books or materials required for purchase.

Course Description: A hands-on course on New Hampshire politics and policymaking, in which students will identify a Bill currently active in the NH General Court and develop and execute a step-by-step plan for helping get it enacted or defeated. No books need to be purchased for this course; All materials will be freely available online or through the UNH Library portal.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Instructor: Stephen Pimpare, Principal Lecturer, UNH-Manchester Department of Business & Public Affairs, Education:

  • Ph.D., Political Science, City University of New York
  • B.S., Community & Human Services, State University of New York

Outcomes: By the end of the course, you will be able to do the following:

  • Explain the process by which laws do (or do not) become enacted in NH and describe how this process differs from other state legislatures;
  • Demonstrate substantive expertise in at least one current policy area active in the NH General Court;
  • Communicate that expertise in a variety of oral, written, and visual forms, across multiple settings, for diverse audiences;
  • Compare academic and theoretical models of the policymaking process with what you observe in Concord;
  • Explain how the unusual size of the NH legislature affects policymaking in the State;
  • Explain the circumstances under which citizens and advocacy organizations can affect the policymaking process;
  • Demonstrate confidence in your substantive policy expertise and knowledge of NH political processes;
  • Describe the power individuals have to shape policy, and explain how you can make change in a system that is resistant to it.