Electives

students talking around a conference table

Electives

 

Electives are available in many substantive areas.  Topics and courses are added on a continuing basis.  In addition, independent studies with leading experts can be arranged to match specialized student interests. Recent examples include independent studies on trade policy and tax policy.

Students may propose additional electives if they make sense in terms of the student’s interests and academic plan.  Discussion with an advisor should inform this choice


Elective Courses are offered in many Substantive Areas, including:

  • Communication and Strategy for Policy Impact
  • Data Analysis for Public Policy  
  • Community Development
  • Poverty and Inequality
  • Health and Health Policy
  • Interpersonal Violence
  • Education and Schools
  • Environment and Natural Resources
  • Families, Youth and Children
  • Organizational Leadership
     

Departments throughout UNH offer Elective Courses, including:

  • Education
  • History
  • Sociology
  • Natural Resources
  • Political Science
  • Business Administration
  • Human Development and Family Studies
  • Health Policy and Management
  • UNH School of Law
  • Analytics

 

To view course offerings per semester, please click on the appropriate tab and select the course title you are interested in for a  course description.  

 

 

Online
Instructor: Anthony Pescosolido
CRN: 13366
Credits: 3
Develops an understanding of individual and work group dynamics in relation to personal and group effectiveness in diverse organizations. Includes: individual and group differences; work groups and teams; interpersonal communications; motivation and rewards; influence and empowerment; conflict resolution; management models; and leadership. Taught experientially.

Mondays 5:31 p.m. to 9:14 p.m. |UNH Manchester, Pandora Building
Instructor: William Hassey
CRN: 17045
Credits: 3
Develops an understanding of individual and work group dynamics in relation to personal and group effectiveness in diverse organizations. Includes: individual and group differences; work groups and teams; interpersonal communications; motivation and rewards; influence and empowerment; conflict resolution; management models; and leadership. Taught experientially.

Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:14 p.m. | Paul College 215
Instructor: Vanessa Druskat
CRN: 12243
Credits: 3
Develops an understanding of individual and work group dynamics in relation to personal and group effectiveness in diverse organizations. Includes: individual and group differences; work groups and teams; interpersonal communications; motivation and rewards; influence and empowerment; conflict resolution; management models; and leadership. Taught experientially.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:40 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. | Kingsbury N111
Instructor: Kevin Gardner
CRN: 16807
Credits: 3
Course begins with exploration of the precept that we live in, and must design engineering works for, a world with a finite supply of natural resources and with limited life support capacity. Tools for sustainability engineering are the major focus of the course, which include life cycle, analysis and life cycle impact analysis, the metrics and mass and energy flow analyses used in the field of industrial ecology, and environmental management systems. 

Online
Instructor: Sanjeev Sharma, Robrecht Vanrijkel 
CRN: 13792
Credits: 3
Budgeting, goal setting, financial planning and financial analysis for development organizations.

Online
Instructor: Virginia Garland
CRN: 10607
Credits: 4
To assume leadership roles, beginning teachers need to develop an informed understanding of how they can operate effectively as decision-makers and agents of change within educational institutions. Such understanding entails knowledge of the politics, history, organization, and function of schools from a variety of viewpoints: historical, political, and cross-cultural. This course focuses on the structure of public education, on the nature of educational change, and the teacher's role in the change process. 

Online
Instructor: Virginia Garland
CRN: 10340
Credits: 4
To assume leadership roles, beginning teachers need to develop an informed understanding of how they can operate effectively as decision-makers and agents of change within educational institutions. Such understanding entails knowledge of the politics, history, organization, and function of schools from a variety of viewpoints: historical, political, and cross-cultural. This course focuses on the structure of public education, on the nature of educational change, and the teacher's role in the change process. 

Wednesdays 4:10 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. | Morril 204
Instructor: Shaleen Cassily
CRN: 10339
Credits: 4
To assume leadership roles, beginning teachers need to develop an informed understanding of how they can operate effectively as decision-makers and agents of change within educational institutions. Such understanding entails knowledge of the politics, history, organization, and function of schools from a variety of viewpoints: historical, political, and cross-cultural. This course focuses on the structure of public education, on the nature of educational change, and the teacher's role in the change process. 

Tuesdays 4:10 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. | Kingsbury N134
Instructor: Emilie Reagan
CRN: 12620
Credits: 4
An applied statistics course that covers introductory level approaches to examining quantitative information. Students spend about half of class time in the computer lab analyzing real data from the behavioral and social sciences. An emphasis is placed on the role of statistics in making empirically-based policy decisions. 

Online
Instructor: Jade Lee
CRN: 16397
Credits: 4
This course provides an introduction to research methods in education and the social sciences. Issues from a wide variety of perspectives on research are covered, including the formal procedures employed by experimental psychologists, qualitative perspectives, and techniques used by researchers involved in exploratory investigations in schools and other real-life settings. The design and implementation of research studies is contextualized in current educational and social science issues. 

Online
Instructor: Jade Lee
CRN: 15332
Credits: 4
In this course, we examine educational assessment within three different paradigms. First we study the bases for assessment. Next we learn how one designs and administers assessment tasks within the classroom setting. Finally, we examine how one should interpret and utilize the results from standardized tests. We work to become intelligent readers, critics, and consumers of educational assessments. The topics covered in this course are relevant to several other fields including (but not limited to) psychology, social work, family studies, and nonprofit management. 

Online |  Half-term 
Instructor: Todd DeMitchell
CRN: 16399
Credits: 2
An experimental course for the purpose of introducing a new course or teaching a special topic for a semester in an area of specialization in Education. 

Online |  Half-term 
Instructor: Todd DeMitchell
CRN: 16950
Credits: 2
An experimental course for the purpose of introducing a new course or teaching a special topic for a semester in an area of specialization in Education

Online with some campus visits
Instructor: Todd DeMitchell
CRN: 16408
Credits: 4
Policy systems and fundamental values shaping the development and enactment of education policy at the federal, state, and local levels. 

Thursdays 4:10 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. | Morrill 204
Instructor: Hadley Solomon
CRN: 16414
Credits: 4
Conceptual aspects and practical realities of the research process applied to problems in education and human service disciplines. Develops skills necessary to use, as well as conduct, research. 

Mondays and Wednesdays 2:10 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. | Pettee Hall 114
Instructor: Prashant Mittal 
CRN: 14871
Credits: 4
This course introduces students to the field of health analytics and data science. It expands upon introductory statistical and data manipulation methods to include data mining, predictive analytics, cluster analysis, trend and pattern recognition, and data visualization. It couples data skills with interpretive and communication skills. Students will also be exposed to basic statistical programming. There will be a graduate component of the course (812) where students will work on advanced concepts and complete a separate culminating project

Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:10 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. | Horton 304
Instructor: Lucy Salyer
CRN: 16695
Credits: 4

In-depth thematic exploration of the role of law in American life. Topics include Race and Equality in American Law; Community, Pluralism, and American Law; Property, Liberty, and Law; Gender and Law. May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission. Consult department listing for topics.

Additional Course Description: 

What are “human rights”?  This course explores the development of international law and human rights from the late 1700s to the present, examining how the meaning of “human rights” has shifted over time.  While the course is anchored in the United States, it will analyze broader global debates over “human rights” that were sparked by slavery, imperial conquest, migration, genocide, the law of warfare, the creation and disappearance of states, gender violence, and mass expulsions.  Who defined human rights and what mechanisms were developed to address abuses? The course takes both a “bottom up” and a “top down” approach.  It pays close attention to how individuals and groups--the victims of abuses--shaped international law and human rights.  It also examines the responses of both governmental (the State Department, the United Nations, the World Court) and non-governmental organizations (e.g. Amnesty International) in negotiating treaties, holding trials and hearings, investigating and processing claims, and creating new international standards and conventions on human rights.

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 8:10 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. | Horton 210
Instructor: Kurk Dorsey
CRN: 15505
Credits: 4

This course examines how nature has been a factor in American history and how Americans have wrestled with the concepts of nature and culture. Topics include industrialization, evolution, conservationism, environmentalism, and environmental diplomacy. 

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 9:10 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. | Horton 210
Instructor: Kurk Dorsey
CRN: 16697
Credits: 4

The history of American diplomacy from the colonial era to the present, with the dividing point at 1900. The focus will be on both the foreign and domestic influences that shaped American diplomacy. 

Mondays 11:10 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. | Horton 422
Instructor: Ellen Fitzpatrick
CRN: 16706
Credits: 3

An introduction to major historians and historiographical issues in the history of the U.S. since 1820. Intended to serve as a foundation for research in the field and as preparation for graduate examinations. Permission required for those not enrolled in History Graduate Program. 

Mondays 9:10 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. | Horton 422
Instructor: Cynthia Van Zandt
CRN: 16878
Credits: 3

Topics include 1) Early American Society; 2) Early American Culture; 3) Revolutionary Period; 4) 19th Century; 5) 20th Century. Focuses on existing historical literature on a given topic, such as American slavery. Students normally read extensively, discuss major issues and the literature in class meetings, and write essays that examine the literature critically. 

Mondays 1:10 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall 106
Instructor: Maureen Ittig
CRN: 15288
Credits: 4

Investigations of physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Particular attention to various social practices, policies, and programs that affect sexual attitudes and behaviors. 

Mondays 9:10 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall 109
Instructor: Tyler Jamison
CRN: 15306
Credits: 4

Explores the intersection of race, class, and gender in family life in the United States. Theory, research and other relevant literature used to examine the variety of family configurations in our society today and the diverse experiences that families have as the result of existing social, political, and economic institutions. The strengths various family types considered, as well as the particular challenges these families may encounter in contemporary society.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:10 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. | Hewitt 131
Instructor: Maureen Ittig
CRN: 14693
Credits: 4

Analysis of the connection between family support programs and family policy. Program planning, implementation and evaluation are stressed. The research, theory, history, and current status of model family programs are examined. 

Mondays 5:10 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall 106
Instructor: Catherine Berube
CRN: 15308
Credits: 4

This course is designed to familiarize students with the specialized laws and adjudicative systems that govern children, adolescents and families and reflect society's effort to balance competing interests and goals. It provides the chance to explore laws and processes that affect children and adolescents as they interact with their caregivers, families and society at large; permission. 

Tuesdays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall 106
Instructor: Catherine Berube
CRN: 14695
Credits: 4

Exploration of laws that affect families as members interact with each other and with society in general. Prereq: management and decision making; family relations; and permission. 

Wednesdays 8:40 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. | Huddleston G10
Instructor: Donna Perkins
CRN: 11967
Credits: 4

This is the second course in the Justice Studies graduate program sequence on research methods and it focuses on how to conduct applied research in the Justice Studies field including how to use quantitative methods in more applied settings and specific research tools frequently used in applied settings (e.g. qualitative methods and program evaluation). Students will work on a class research project as well as their own individual projects. 

Online
Instructor: Philip Reichel
CRN: 14971
Credits: 3

Only a small portion of international criminal law disputes are resolved in some form of international court like the International Criminal Court or a special tribunal. The majority are instead resolved in a domestic court system, meaning that, effectively, the practice of international criminal law occurs in a number of different criminal justice systems. This course familiarizes students with the varieties of criminal justice systems around the world. Though each country or region has its own individual system tailored to its history and culture, regional and cultural similarities exist in the structure and approach of individual systems. The course will ground students in the major types of criminal justice systems around the world, from the Anglo-American system to a European system to an Islamic system. The course will look both at individual systems from countries that have a strong presence in the world of international criminal law and at the general principles that underlie the differences in major systems. 

Online
Instructor: TBA
CRN: 14969
Credits: 2

Tuesdays 3:10 p.m. to 5:10 p.m. | UNH Law (Concord)
Instructor: Lucy Hodder
CRN: 14968
Credits: 2

This course will teach students key provisions of federal law regulating the health care delivery and finance system through an analysis of the Affordable Care Act and its historic implementation. Students will review currently debated policy implications of the ACA and analyze legal challenges to it. Students will be guided through two short writing assignments, and choose a longer in depth client oriented analysis of a health care law or issue. Satisfies upper level writing requirement. 

Thursdays 5:15 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. | UNH Law (Concord)
Instructor: TBA
CRN: 14254
Credits: 3

This course provides a general introduction to the law and policy of health care delivery in the United States. You will gain an understanding of the legal and policy considerations that shape the relationships between providers - physicians and hospitals, patients, and regulators, and how different areas of law have developed when applied within the health care industry. This course will also give students an understanding of how public health policy is developed and intersects with the health care delivery system. Because health law is a broad subject matter, this course will briefly cover a wide range of topics, including the physician-patient relationship, informed consent, privacy and confidentiality, medical malpractice, conflicts of interest, human subjects research, regulation of drugs and devices, end-of-life decision-making, legal issues surrounding human genetics, and public health policy. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. | UNH Law (Concord)
Instructor: Enrique Mesa 
CRN: 14935
Credits: 3

Immigration law is complex and multi-faceted; it touches on other substantive areas of the law including constitutional law, criminal law and foreign policy. By the end of the semester students should be able to think critically about the historical, theoretical and constitutional context of immigration law, including division of immigration power between federal and state government as well as limits to the federal immigration power under the United States Constitution and the Amendments; possess a good understanding of the core principles of immigration law, its norms and practices; develop analytical skills to question and appraise immigration law policies and practices; identify current immigration issues in the United States, including analyzing the constitutionality and rationality of recent state and federal legislative enactments and proposals; and explore causes of present immigration problems and violations and what possible steps might Congress or states take to remedy flaws in current legislation on immigration. Eligibility: Open to 2Ls and 3Ls. Course format: lecture and problem based. Classroom attendance and participation are required. 

Mondays 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. | UNH Law (Concord)
Instructor: Michael Dube
CRN: 14936
Credits: 2

Amateur Sports Law: Legal Issues in Youth, College and Recreational Sports. This course examines various legal issues in interscholastic and intercollegiate sports. Topics include issues in Title IX gender discrimination, antitrust (including combinations of competing schools/conferences), constitutional law (including freedom of speech/association/religion), contract law, land use and environmental law issues for recreational sports, the regulatory authority of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and of high school athletic associations, regulation of private educational institutions and sports associations, torts and insurance-related issues of schools for injuries suffered by athletes and spectators, the evolving conception of college athletes as professionals, athletic participation in taxpayer funded youth sports by homeschooled students, drug testing and rights to appeal, legal responsibilities of coaches to safeguard amateur players (including from concussions and unsafe practice conditions), and participation in sports by disabled athletes. Pursuit of careers in sports law, especially compliance positions at universities and colleges, is also be covered. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:10 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. | James 140
Instructor: Catherine Ashcraft
CRN: 11737
Credits: 4

Students examine policies for managing human activities to sustain the health of regional ecosystems and planetary life-support systems. Selected problems of the international commons (oceans, marine resources, atmosphere, migratory species); global and regional carrying capacity (population, resource consumption), internationally shared ecosystems (trans-boundary watersheds, water-bodies, tropical forests); and the relevant international institutions and politics for policy formation, conflict resolution, and implementation. Using a policy-analytic framework, students develop case studies to assess international policies and institutional arrangements to achieve the objectives of Agenda 21--Earth Summit Strategy to Save the Planet. Prereq: permission.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. | Morill 103
Instructor: TBD
CRN: 16947
Credits: 4

Integration of diverse human and natural system interactions in a seminar-based course to understand issues in food system sustainability. Examination of food system structure and function from coupled human and natural systems prospectives. Current and topical issues of food and agriculture include: exploration of using natural resources to meeting growing population demands; conflicting views on meeting food and nutrition requirements; impacts of increased stress on natural resources; inequities and discrimination in the food system; impact on dietary guidelines on the environment. Prereq: introductory nutrition course or by permission. 

Mondays 3:10 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Horton 327
Instructor: Richard Aliano
CRN: 12038
Credits: 3

Impact of judicial decisions on public policy and influences on judicial decision making at the federal, state, and local levels. 

Thursdays 6:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. | UNH Manchester, Pandora Building
Instructor: Carolyn Arcand
CRN: 17056
Credits: 3

Policy and program evaluation of federal, state, and local governmental enterprise; focuses on the politics, practices, and methods of evaluative investigation. Evaluation as a technique for providing rational information for budgetary and policy-making decisions.

Tuesdays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Horton 327
Instructor: Andrew Macpherson
CRN: 16480
Credits: 3

The goal of the Security Intelligence Study course is to provide an opportunity for students to apply research and analysis models used by intelligence professionals to a real world problem. Using unclassified public sources students research and present an analytical product to help limit risk for a government decision maker. Participants learn about and use publicly available data and intelligence analysis models. 

Tuesdays 3:10 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Horton 327
Instructor: Daniel Bromberg
CRN: 16919
Credits: 3

Advanced analysis and individual research.

Mondays 3:10 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Murkland 201
Instructor: Divva Devasher
CRN: 16921
Credits: 3

Advanced analysis focusing on government and politics in foreign nations or regions. Areas of interest may include: constitutional structures, political parties and interest groups, legislatures, bureaucracy and public policy. Topics address such concerns as: religion and politics, patterns of economic development, ethnic strife, political leadership.

Mondays 6:01 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | UNH Manchester, Pandora Building
Instructor: Daniel Bromberg
CRN: 17057
Credits: 3

Introduction to essential aspects of public and non-profit administration. Critical concepts and theoretical bases; operational nature of public and non-profit administration; contributions of key scholars and practitioners to the study and understanding of public and non-profit administration. 

Online
Instructor: Melvin Dubnick
CRN: 16922
Credits: 3

Though the use of case studies, analysis and assessment of legal, institutional, social, political and economic settings within public and non-profit sectors. 

Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. | UNH Manchester, Pandora Building
Instructor: Ann-Marie Matteucci
CRN: 17061
Credits: 3

The focus of this course is on the pattern of services in the United States and on the structure and function of their component parts. It examines the impact on the system of a wide range of external factors including social, political, economic, professional, legal, and technological forces. 

Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. | UNH Manchester, Pandora Building
Instructor: Philip Alexakos
CRN: 16921
Credits: 3

This course offers a general introduction to the ecological basis of health and disease. It applies the principles and framework of ecosystems to human health problems associated with environmental hazards, including toxic and infectious agents that contaminate our air, water, food, the work place and other special environments. Links between environmental and occupational health effects will be explored within the public health model. Policy required for regulation and alternative strategies for prevention will be discussed.

Tuesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. | UNH Manchester, Pandora Building
Instructor: David Laflamme
CRN: 17062
Credits: 3

A graduate level course which provides fundamental concepts of the behavioral sciences as they illuminate public health. Since public health practice is the application of physical, biological and behavioral knowledge to living societies, a firm understanding of human social organization and behavior is essential. Individual and community responses to prevention, identification of symptoms, diagnoses, treatments, chronic ailments and rehabilitation are discussed. In each of these areas, the course explores the interaction between community, family, patient, and health care provider. 

Tuesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. | UNH Manchester, Pandora Building
Instructor: Frederick Rusczek
CRN: 17067
Credits: 3

This course focuses on public health managers, organizational culture, management process, management functions and roles, leadership, motivation, communication, and human resource management.

Tuesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. | UNH Manchester, Pandora Building
Instructor: Semra Aytur
CRN: 17065
Credits: 3

An analysis of the public policy process, the development of public health policy in the United States, and a discussion of specific public health policy issues with international comparisons. This course begins with an analytical framework for analyzing the American political system and process. It is followed by a general introduction to health policy in the United States with examples of specific policies and programs. Students will be asked to examine specific public health policy in-depth.

Tuesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. with 2-3 online sessions | UNH Manchester, Pandora Building
Instructor: Nicholas Smither
CRN: 17063
Credits: 3

This course examines selected ethical issues arising in public health policy and practice and ethical dilemmas faced by public health professionals, practitioners, and researchers. Students analyze competing personal, organizational, professional, and societal interests, values, and responsibilities. Case studies apply different models of ethical decision making and provide MPH students with an added opportunity to explore and clarify their values and those of their colleagues.

Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. | UNH Manchester, Pandora Building
Instructor: Joseph Sabia
CRN: 17068
Credits: 3

This course gives each student a hands-on opportunity to become familiar with a broad range of health economics issues and analyses. The objective is to help its graduates successfully compete for advancement in careers requiring knowledge of health policy analysis.

Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. | UNH Manchester, Pandora Building
Instructor: TBD
CRN: 17064
Credits: 3

Study of a special topic in Public Health Policy and Management. May be repeated up to a maximum of 3 credits. Prereq: permission.

Additional Course Description: 

Utilizing GIS (Geographic Information Systems) within the field of Public Health allows professionals to combine computer-mapping capabilities and database management with public health policy and the knowledge about the social determinants of health to help improve the health of the population. Using GIS techniques allows public health professionals a unique way to address current public health problems and to help anticipate potential health issues before they arise

Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:40 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. | Spaulding Life Science 230
Instructor: Robert Robertson
CRN: 16548
Credits: 4

A cross-disciplinary perspective on the issues, problems, and methods of Social Impact Assessment (SIA). The analytic approach and theoretical framework provided applied to the assessment of very diverse events--changes in the natural environment, local economy, or dominant technology. SIA is required of most U.S. and Canadian federal and state sponsored projects that come under the National Environmental Protection Act, to include tourism, park and recreation development, highways, reservoirs, timber production, hazardous waste disposal, as well as policy issues. SIA is also required for all projects funded by international donor agencies such as USIA, the World Bank, and private international development agencies. 

Tuesdays 11:10 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. | Huddleston Hall, G11
Instructor: Curt Grimm
CRN: 15171
Credits: 3

How to develop and implement strategies that drive policy change. Students will learn how to analyze approaches to changing policy, and then evaluate the most viable option for specific circumstances. Students will review different influence models, discuss which ones work best in varying situations and identify how influence models connect to policy campaigns. Students will review current campaigns, learn central elements of a successful campaign to change public policy, and create their own campaign plans.

Non MPP students may enroll with permission.

Wednesdays 9:40 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. | McConnell 302
Instructor: Heather Turner
CRN: 16501
Credits: 4

Introduces students to different sociological approaches for studying and understanding mental health and illness. Students examine the social distribution of mental illness in the United State and the social-structural factors that help to explain mental health variations. Also addresses issues surrounding mental health treatment, systems, and policies for the mentally ill. 

Tuesdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. | McConnell 302
Instructor: Nicole Fox
CRN: 15251
Credits: 4

Occasional or experimental offerings. May be repeated for different topics.

Mondays 9:40 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. | McConnell 302
Instructor: Lawrence Hamilton
CRN: 10404
Credits: 4

Application of statistical methods to the analysis of social data, with particular emphasis on multiple regression and related topics. (SOC 901.01) Non-majors may add by permission of the instructor.

Thursdays 9:40 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. | McConnell 302
Instructor: Rebecca Glauber
CRN: 14018
Credits: 3

Systematic investigation of each step in the design and implementation of sociological research. Selected techniques of data collection and analyses are pursued. Prereq: methods of social research; social statistics;/or their equivalents or permission. 

Thursdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. | McConnell 302
Instructor: Cesar Rebellon
CRN: 16502
Credits: 4

Serves as the core course for the Crime and Conflict concentration. Theories and patterns of crime; the social origins of violent and nonviolent conflict; the role of social factors in the justice system; alternative forms of crime control and conflict management. 

Wednesdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. | Pettee Hall G02
Instructor: Kim Kelsey
CRN: 10728
Credits: 3

Major social work policy and program questions in the field of child welfare introduced. The relationship between child welfare and the rest of the social work profession analyzed. Various types of child welfare services, some aspects of social and child welfare policy studied, as well as current research and practice issues in child welfare services. 

Mondays 3:40 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall G02
Instructor: Cory Morton
CRN: 10622
Credits: 3

The aim of this course is to prepare students to act as informed human service professionals through a better understanding of social problems, social welfare policy, and the American social welfare system. Students are provided with an overview of the origins and development of social welfare policy in the United States, the political processes in our federal and state systems, and the values and ethics which shape our present social welfare system. The course also helps students examine ways they can influence policy formulation while advocating for human rights and social/economic justice. 

Tuesdays 10:10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. | Pettee Hall G02
Instructor: Patrick Shannon
CRN: 10629
Credits: 3

The aim of this course is to prepare students to act as informed human service professionals through a better understanding of social problems, social welfare policy, and the American social welfare system. Students are provided with an overview of the origins and development of social welfare policy in the United States, the political processes in our federal and state systems, and the values and ethics which shape our present social welfare system. The course also helps students examine ways they can influence policy formulation while advocating for human rights and social/economic justice. 

Mondays 10:10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. | Pettee Hall G02
Instructor: TBD
CRN: 10623
Credits: 3

In this course, students learn about behavior and development and its context across the lifecycle. The semester addresses growth and development from the prenatal period through the end of life using social systems theory/person-in-the-environment as a conceptual framework. The different systems that impact individual development including family, community, and larger systems are examined. Human worth and social justice themes permeate course materials, class discussions, and activities. 

 

Tuesdays 1:10 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. | Pettee Hall G13
Instructor: TBD
CRN: 10626
Credits: 3

In this course, students learn about behavior and development and its context across the lifecycle. The semester addresses growth and development from the prenatal period through the end of life using social systems theory/person-in-the-environment as a conceptual framework. The different systems that impact individual development including family, community, and larger systems are examined. Human worth and social justice themes permeate course materials, class discussions, and activities. 

Durham Courses

Fridays 10:10 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. | Kendall 106 
Instructor: TBD 
CRN: 56981 
Credits: 3

Designed to equip students with the skills they will need as practitioners to advance public policy goals through the development and execution of responsive communications strategy. Students will gain an understanding of the media landscape and trends in journalism; how to identify media opportunities and target audiences; how to write to successfully communicate to various audiences; and basic skills to prepare for and give effective interviews to communicate policy messages.

  • Non-MPP students may enroll by permission only.
  • See instructor for permission then sign up in the dept office before registering through WEBCAT.

Wednesdays 5:40 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Paul College 205 
Instructor: Carole Barnett 
CRN: 55447 
Credits: 3

The goal of this cross-disciplinary course is to develop students' deep understanding of the dynamic, mutually reinforcing power of leadership follower relations in modern organizations - including both toxic and beneficial processes and outcomes. Readings draw on the literatures from business, social sciences, and philosophy to illuminate the complexities of leading in 21st century corporations, public service organizations, institutions of higher learning, and government agencies. A diverse cross-section of students from doctoral and master level programs across all UNH schools, colleges, and departments participate in the course in order to most broadly examine how the leader-follower relationship can succeed or fail in its pursuit of organizational strategies and objectives. Prereq: permission. (contact Susan Browning, MBA Program Coordinator for permission: Susan.Browning@unh.edu )

Tuesdays or Thursdays 6:10 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. | Kingsbury N129 
Instructor: Michael Routhier 
CRN: 57172 
Credits: 4

Advanced or specialized topics not normally covered in regular course offerings. May be repeated, but not in duplicate areas. Prereq: permission. 

Mondays and Wednesdays 3:40 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. | Murkland G17 
Instructor: Michael Swack
CRN: 57249
Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide the participant with an overall understanding of the microfinance institutions including management, planning and monitoring strategies, tools, and systems. Sessions will seek to develop skills and capacity to examine various areas, such as competition, expansion, product development, service delivery and human resource, marketing, and information management systems. Prereq: Project Design. 

Mondays and Wednesdays 12:40 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. | Paul College Business and Economics 235
Instructor: Michael Swack
CRN: 57248
Credits: 3

This course examines innovative organizations that are created to improve people's lives and that contribute to improved social, economic and environmental conditions. These organizations adapt various aspects of the market model emphasizing both financial vaibility and social (including environmental) goals - measuring achievement in all of the areas. Social enterprises are often launched to address problems where government, the private sector and the traditional non-profit sector fail to provide a public good. The course emphasis is on how such organizations are started, the business models they develop, and how they are sustained. We will have a wide range of social entrepreneurs presenting in the class. Permission required. 

EDUC 967 (01) - School Law

Saturdays 8:10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. | Morrill 103 
Instructor: Todd DeMitchell
CRN: 56638
Credits: 4

Relationship of law to public education. Emphasis on federal constitution, New Hampshire statutes, and case law related to public interests served by elementary and secondary education. Special topics: church-state relationship, due process, desegregation, teacher employment, discrimination, negotiations, student rights, tort liability. 

Mondays and Wednesdays  2:10 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. | Horton 201 
Instructor: Ellen Fitzpatrick
CRN: 56608
Credits: 4

Influential thinkers and ideas have shaped American politics, society, economy, and culture since the Civil War. Among the topics explored are American Victorianism, Social Darwinism, Pragmatism, Modernism and its opponents, gender and identity politics and post modernism. Mark Twain, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Thorstein Veblen, W.E.B. Dubois, John Dewey, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Hannah Arendt, Thomas Kuhn, Malcolm X, Susan Sontag and William F. Buckley Jr. will be among the thinkers explored. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. | Horton 304 
Instructor: Julia Rodriguez
CRN: 54312
Credits: 4

This course provides a close examination of major topics in twentieth-century Latin American history, seen especially through the lens of first-person narrative and everyday life experiences. Topics examined include revolutions, dictatorship, popular culture, social movements, drugs, gangs, and migration. Recurring themes that run throughout the course include inequality, violence, human rights, social movements, identity, globalization, and the environment. Sources include first person accounts, memoirs, novels, and films, in addition to selected scholarly publications. Our goal is to understand some of the major transitions in Latin America in the last hundred years, and to further engage our curiosity about the region by delving into the details of some individual lives and how they were intertwined with larger events and processes.
Attributes:
 Online with some campus visits, EUNH 

Thursdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. | Horton 422
Instructor: Jason Sokol
CRN: 55471
Credits: 4

In 1903, W.E.B. Du Bois famously wrote that “the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line.” This seminar examines major works on race in twentieth-century America. It focuses most closely (but not exclusively) on the African American experience. This course places particular emphasis on the modern civil rights struggle, its origins, and the movement’s evolving legacy. We read classic texts as well as the most recent scholarship. We will also explore the nature of historical inquiry itself, modes of interpretation, and different approaches to writing history – from monographs and biographies to works of narrative history.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:40 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall 106
Instructor: Erin Sharp
CRN: 55226
Credits: 4

Investigations of physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Particular attention to various social practices, policies, and programs that affect sexual attitudes and behaviors. 

Mondays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall 106
Instructor: Catherine Berube
CRN: 55228
Credits: 4

This course is designed to familiarize students with the specialized laws and adjudicative systems that govern children, adolescents and families and reflect society's effort to balance competing interests and goals. It provides the chance to explore laws and processes that affect children and adolescents as they interact with their caregivers, families and society at large; permission. 

Tuesdays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall 106
Instructor: Catherine Berube
CRN: 55229
Credits: 4

Exploration of laws that affect families as members interact with each other and with society in general. Prereq: management and decision making; family relations; and permission. 

Fridays 10:40 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. | Huddleston G10
Instructor: TBD
CRN: 53450
Credits: 4

New or specialized courses are presented under this listing. Staff present material not normally covered by the course offerings. Cross-listed courses. May be repeated but not duplicate content. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:10 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. | Spaulding Life Science 230 
Instructor: John Carroll
CRN: 55427
Credits: 4

Deeper more fundamental philosophical questions, including spiritual values questions, are being asked concerning the ecological/environmental challenge of our time; its causes and resolution. Aspects of this challenge--environmental education, energy, food, agriculture, and natural resources--analyzed with ethics and values approaches. Students develop ways of responding to problem identification and resolution.

Mondays 6:10 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | James G46
Instructor: John Coon
CRN: 51216
Credits: 3

Federal and state environmental statutory and administrative law, its application, strengths and weaknesses, and options for future amendment.

Mondays and Wednesdays 12:10 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. | James 140
Instructor: Catherine Ashcraft
CRN: 51491
Credits: 4
Special Fees: $25.00

Theories and practices of environmental dispute settlement. Roles of public, non-governmental and governmental organizations. Effectiveness of public participation initiatives in influencing public policy decisions and/or resolving environmental conflicts. Alternative approaches to consensus (policy dialogues, joint problem solving; strategic planning; negotiation, mediation) as well as litigation. Specific cases are critiqued and evaluated; conflict resolution skills are developed. Students observe and/or participate in ongoing local decision processes. Prereq: permission. Lab. Special fee. See instructor for permission then sign up in the dept office before registering through WEBCAT.

Tuesdays and Thursdays  9:40 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. | Rudman 110 
Thursdays 8:10 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. | Rudman 110
Instructor: Joanne Burke
CRN: 54052
Credits: 4

Food system structure and function from a coupled human and natural systems perspective. Topics include: an exploration of using natural resources to meet growing population demands; conflicting views on meeting food and nutrition requirements; impacts of increased stress on natural resources; inequities and discrimination in the food system; impact of dietary guidelines on the environment. Study of diverse human and natural system interactions are integrated to understand issues in food system sustainability. You must sign up in the Dept Office before registering through WEBCAT.

Tuesdays 3:10 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Horton 327 
Instructor: Lawrence Reardon
CRN: 56676
Credits: 3

This course has been designed to introduce advanced undergraduates and graduate students to the current theoretical discussions in international political economy. The course analyzes the development of current international economic regimes, as well as look at systemic theories (interdependence, hegemonic stability), domestic determinants (bureaucratic, interest group) and decision-making theories (rational choice). By monitoring current economic and political news, students are challenged to apply these ideas to explain the current problems in political economy. 

Mondays 3:10 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Horton 327 
Instructor: Tama Andrews
CRN: 52912
Credits: 3

What is American federalism? What is the meaning of the term intergovernmental relations? Which level of government (national, state, local) should have primary responsibility for specific policy areas? Who is responsible? Who should pay and how? Who has and who should have influence in policymaking and service delivery?  What are the differences between national, state and local government responsibilities and service delivery? These questions will be part of our exploration of federalism and intergovernmental relations.

The course is designed to familiarize students with major aspects of federalism and intergovernmental relations (IGR), including conceptual/historical foundations, theoretical approaches, and contemporary issues, through readings, and discussions. By the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of historic and current issues involving federalism and IGR,  will have a better comprehension of why all levels of American government do what they do (or don't) and how government attempts to respond to its citizens.

Wednesdays 3:10 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Horton 327 
Instructor: Andrew Smith
CRN: 56680
Credits: 3

Tuesdays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Horton 327 
Instructor: Carolyn Arcand
CRN: 56822
Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary course will incorporate political science, economics, history, sociology, and law to examine the current economic status of women, and to analyze the impact of public policy and public programs on women’s economic roles. Attention will be paid to theories of difference in women’s and men’s occupational and earnings outcomes, as well as causes of difference in economic outcomes between women. Students will explore the impact of these differences through thoughtful examination, discussion, interpretation, and presentation on policies and programs that impact women’s working lives.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:40 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. | Rudman G89
Instructor: Robert Robertson
CRN: 55596
Credits: 4

A cross-disciplinary perspective on the issues, problems, and methods of Social Impact Assessment (SIA). The analytic approach and theoretical framework provided applied to the assessment of very diverse events--changes in the natural environment, local economy, or dominant technology. SIA is required of most U.S. and Canadian federal and state sponsored projects that come under the National Environmental Protection Act, to include tourism, park and recreation development, highways, reservoirs, timber production, hazardous waste disposal, as well as policy issues. SIA is also required for all projects funded by international donor agencies such as USIA, the World Bank, and private international development agencies. 

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 1:10 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. | James G54
Instructor: John Halstead
CRN: 56722
Credits: 4

Concepts and methods of delineating regional economies, methods of measuring activity, regional development, and public policies. Emphasis on empirical research studies. Prereq: intermediate economy theory or permission. 

Mondays 12:40 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. | McConnell 302
Instructor: James Tucker
CRN: 54370
Credits: 4
Analysis of the social conditions associated with the major forms of conflict management in human societies: discipline, rebellion, vengeance, negotiation, mediation, law, therapy, supernaturalism, and avoidance. 
Mondays 3:40 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Pettee G02
Instructor: TBD
CRN: 50525
Credits: 3
In this course, students learn about behavior and development and its context across the life cycle from a macro systems perspective. The macrosystems that impact individual development are examined. Societal forces that are often invisible shape and profoundly alter life experiences of larger numbers of people. HSBE II pays special attention to social relationships that promote welfare of some while limiting opportunities and choices for others. the semester explores the influence of class, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, age, sexual orientation, and other aspects of diversity on development and behavior of larger systems. 
Tuesdays 3:40 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. | Pettee Hall G02 
Instructor: Bo Rin Kim 
CRN: 50545
Credits: 3

In this course, students learn about behavior and development and its context across the life cycle from a macro systems perspective. The macrosystems that impact individual development are examined. Societal forces that are often invisible shape and profoundly alter life experiences of larger numbers of people. HSBE II pays special attention to social relationships that promote welfare of some while limiting opportunities and choices for others. the semester explores the influence of class, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, age, sexual orientation, and other aspects of diversity on development and behavior of larger systems. 

Mondays 1:10 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. | Pettee Hall G13
Instructor: Richard Lusenhop
CRN: 51837
Credits: 3

This course is an extension of Social Welfare Policy I. Both courses view social welfare policy as the framework in which social work services are developed and delivered. That is, policies provide the context for direct practice. Social Welfare Policy II examines policy analysis as a process with underlying theory and methodology. This process emphasizes political advocacy in the pursuit of human rights, and social and economic justice. The course integrates policy and practice, in part, through student research and analysis of specific social problems and client populations relevant to the student's volunteer, work, and/or field internship experience.

  • Prereq: SW 820. 
Tuesdays 6:10 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pettee Hall G02 
Instructor: Patrick Shannon
CRN: 51838
Credits: 3

This course is an extension of Social Welfare Policy I. Both courses view social welfare policy as the framework in which social work services are developed and delivered. That is, policies provide the context for direct practice. Social Welfare Policy II examines policy analysis as a process with underlying theory and methodology. This process emphasizes political advocacy in the pursuit of human rights, and social and economic justice. The course integrates policy and practice, in part, through student research and analysis of specific social problems and client populations relevant to the student's volunteer, work, and/or field internship experience. 

  • Prereq: SW 820. 
Tuesdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. | McConnell 302
Instructor: Michele Dillon
CRN: 56703
Credits: 4

This course is designed to cover major methodological and practical issues in the field of evaluation research, including the definition and meaning of evaluation; the purposes of evaluation; the design and conduct of evaluation studies; evidence-based policy writing; and the uses of evaluation results. This is an advanced undergraduate-level and graduate-level course. The prerequisite for the course is successful coursework in methods of research and statistical analysis. 

Thursdays 2:10 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. | McConnell 302 
Instructor: Rebecca Glauber
CRN: 56704
Credits: 4

Why are some jobs more dangerous or less rewarding than others? How do people choose their jobs? How does work shape our health, emotional well-being, and sense of self? How has the structure of work changed over the past decades? And how are race, class, and gender inequalities produced and reproduced in the workplace? This course will consider these important questions and focus on three broad themes: deindustrialization and economic restructuring, service work and the labor process, and the production and reproduction of structural inequalities in the workplace. Students will have a chance to complete original research in this course. The course enrolls advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

Manchester Courses

Mondays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Pandora Building
Instructor: Carolyn Arcand
CRN: 56972
Credits: 3

Examines the legal rules governing regulatory agencies, in the U.S. Topics include regulatory adjudication and rulemaking, legislative and executive control over administrative agencies, judicial review and public participation. Course examines federal and state levels of government. 

Thursdays 6:10 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Pandora Building
Instructor: Paul Dann
CRN: 57085
Credits: 3

Introduction to key actors, theories and concepts in the fields of organizational theory and behavior. 

Wednesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: Carolyn Arcand 
CRN: 56977
Credits: 3
 

Analysis, goal setting, and strategic planning in a governmental setting, with particular emphasis on budgetary processes as a means for controlling policy effectiveness.

Additional 4-hour session required

POLT 918 (M1) - Non-Profit Management

Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: Terry Knowles
CRN: 56978
Credits: 3

Introduction to governance and management in the non-profit sector: finance, development, personnel management, strategic planning, and risk management.
Additional 4-hour session required

Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: Roy Parrish, Sharon McDonnell
CRN: 56961
Credits: 3

Exploration of factors underlying the distribution and determinants of states of health in various human populations. Emphasis is placed on investigative techniques, epidemiologic methodology, and disease prevention. Unlike other core courses in the MPH Program which are 8 weeks in length, this course is 16 weeks in length. Meets in class with synchronous online meetings

Tuesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. | Pandora Building, P368
Instructor: Ann-Marie Matteucci
CRN: 56960
Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the principles of biostatistics. Students learn through classroom instruction, lab instruction and exercises, a variety of statistical methods in public health. Students review measures of central tendency, rates, and standardization, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, comparisons, and simple, multiple and logistic regression techniques. Unlike other core courses in the MPH Program which are 8 weeks in length, this course is 16 weeks in length. 

Thursdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: John Martin
CRN: 56977
Credits: 3
 

This course seeks to provide the legal basis for public health that is needed to effectively practice public health, especially with respect to understanding and enforcing compliance with public health regulations, and managing public health programs and organizations. The course introduces the core elements of law, legal practice and reasoning, and illustrates their application and use in public health. 

Tuesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: TBD
CRN: 56965
Credits: 3
 

Analysis, goal setting, and strategic planning in a governmental setting, with particular emphasis on budgetary processes as a means for controlling policy effectiveness.

Additional 4-hour session required

Wednesdays 5:31 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. | Pandora Building 
Instructor: Carolyn Arcand 
CRN: 56977
Credits: 3
 

Overview of relationships between where people live, work, learn and play (built environment) and their health. Promotes an interdisciplinary approach to address chronic public health problems such as heart disease, obesity and depression, as well as tackling environmental issues.

Meets in class and online

 

 

Online Courses

Instructor: Dwight McNeill
CRN: 57194
Credits: 3

This on-line course provides students with a foundation in population health principles, strategies and analytics. The instructional methodologies include lectures, multiple media resources, individual assignments, and participation in on-line group forums. The course is delivered in 8 modules. Assessments of student progress are made through quizzes, exams, an individual project, and engagement and contributions to the classes.

Instructors: Sanjeev Sharma, Jill Fitzsimmons
CRN: 53870
Credits: 3

This course provides the practitioner with tools of economic analysis that are necessary for effective development practice. Drawing upon principles of macroeconomics, the course explores how markets, property rights, political institutions, government policies, environmental conditions and cultural values interact to produce development outcomes. 

Instructor: Jade Lee
CRN: 55501
Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to research methods in education and the social sciences. Issues from a wide variety of perspectives on research are covered, including the formal procedures employed by experimental psychologists, qualitative perspectives, and techniques used by researchers involved in exploratory investigations in schools and other real-life settings. The design and implementation of research studies is contextualized in current educational and social science issues. 

Instructor: Todd DeMitchell
CRN: 55080
Credits: 4

Our public schools play a vital role in our society. What shall be taught and who shall teach our children are perennial questions. This course explores how the law impacts the educational lives of students and teachers, including issues of church-state relations, free speech, dress codes, and search and seizure. (Also offered as JUST 867.) 

Instructor: Joseph Onosko 
CRN: 55078
Credits: 4 

Emphasizes the development of understandings, dispositions, and skills necessary to effectively participate in P-12 reform discussion and decision-making. The course focuses on foundational issues related to a) the legitimacy of public education, b) accountability-based national reform efforts, and c) the goals and content of school curricula. This on-line course is required for the M.Ed. in Educational Studies or elective for other degrees. 

Instructor: TBD
CRN: TBD
Credits: 4 

Locational crowdsourcing, where users contribute geographic data, is one of the most exciting new areas of data generation and delivery of geographic information in response to emerging situations. In this course we will use crowdsourcing to collect geographic information and analyze it using technology and applications that can be applied anywhere. Course topics and real-world examples incorporate concepts from geography, history, anthropology, sociology, planning, information science, and disaster management. This course will be a hands-on and lab-based to introduce students to the concepts of crowdsourced data acquisition and teach them how to capture and use data.​

Instructor: James Lewis
CRN: 55878 
Credits: 3 

The course introduces students to the evolution, organization and structure of the health services industry. The course examine key components, including patients, providers, payers and suppliers, as well as assessing major issues confronting the system such as population health, evolving reimbursement models, health reform, assessment of quality and costs, epidemiological and demographic imperatives, and changing technology. 

Instructor: Melvin Dubnick 
CRN: 56823
Credits: 3 

Advanced analysis and individual research, including opportunities for direct observation of governmental administration. 

Instructor: Patricia Cox
CRN: 56869
Credits: 3 

In this course, students learn about behavior and development and its context across the life cycle from a macro systems perspective. The macrosystems that impact individual development are examined. Societal forces that are often invisible shape and profoundly alter life experiences of larger numbers of people. HSBE II pays special attention to social relationships that promote welfare of some while limiting opportunities and choices for others. the semester explores the influence of class, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, age, sexual orientation, and other aspects of diversity on development and behavior of larger systems. 

 

 

 

 

May 22 to July 28, 2017, Online
Instructor: Nancy Kinner
CRN: 70450
Credits: 3
Course begins with exploration of the precept that we live in, and must design engineering works for, a world with a finite supply of natural resources and with limited life support capacity. Tools for sustainability engineering are the major focus of the course, which include life cycle, analysis and life cycle impact analysis, the metrics and mass and energy flow analyses used in the field of industrial ecology, and environmental management systems. CIE 851.1HY - CIE 851.1HY is a hybrid course. It meets May 22 - May 28, 2017 online. It then meets July 21 through July 25, 2017 at Shoals Marine Laboratory, Appledore Island. There will be asynchronous chat rooms once per week for one hour. The SML segment is 1 credit and a co-requisite.

May 22 to June 23, 2017 (Mondays and Wednesdays), 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. | Paul College 135
Instructor: Prashant Mittal 
CRN: 70491
Credits: 3
This course is designed to give students a solid understanding of the experience in probability, and inferential statistics. The course provides a foundational understanding of statistical concepts and tools required for decision making in a data science, business, research or policy setting. The course uses case studies and requires extensive use of statistical software. 

June 5 to June 9, 2017 (Monday - Friday),   9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 
Instructor:  Michael Swack
CRN: 70168 
Credits: 3
This course aims to provide students with a general introduction to the basic core competencies and practical skills required of a "generalist" development practitioner and serves as the foundation course for the curriculum. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the interconnectedness of natural sciences and engineering, social science, health sciences, and management, especially as they relate to communities

June 26 to August 8, 2017 (Monday - Friday),  Online
Instructor:  Clayton Mitchell
CRN: 70964
Credits: 3
Provides students working at a graduate level but lacking specific background in ecology with an applied perspective on challenges at the interface of rural development and environmental science. By the end of the course, students should be conversant in the languages of large-scale ecosystem, ecology, and conservation biology, and should have a basic working knowledge of the science of carbon and climate change, land use change and deforestation, and the impacts of land use on biodiversity and water quantity/quality.

June 5 to June 8, 2017 (Monday - Thursday), 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Instructor:  Rosemary Caron 
CRN: 70838 
Credits: 3
An analysis of the public process, the development of public health policy in developing countries, and a discussion of specific public health policy issues with cross-country comparisons. This course begins with an analytical framework for analyzing a public health system and process. It is followed by a general introduction to effective health policies in developing countries with examples of specific policies and programs that have been effective. 

Saturday, June 3, 2017  8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
June 19 to June 22, 2017 (Monday - Thursday) 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Instructors:  Sanjeev Sharma and William Maddocks
CRN: 70188
Credits: 3
Combines theory and practical information for students to learn traditional and contemporary organizational and leadership theories and apply them to their experience in organizations particularly non-profit institutions, non-governmental organizations. The course will focus on personal and inter-personal development such as self-awareness, stress and problem solving, interpersonal skills such as supportive communication, power and influence, motivation and conflict management: group skills such as delegation and team building; and leadership. Permission required. 

June 5 to June 16, 2017 (Monday - Friday) 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., McConnell 340
Instructor:  Stacy VanDeveer
CRN: 70190
Credits: 3
This seminar will reinforce the multidisciplinary breadth and trans-disciplinary perspective of the masters program, providing students with the opportunity to sharpen critical policy analysis skills. The goal of the course is to help students understand the sources of public policy, that is, why we have various public policies and how to produce professional policy analysis.

Saturday , June 3, 2017  8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
June 19 to June 22, 2017 (Monday - Thursday) 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Instructor:  William Maddocks
CRN: 70837
Credits: 2
Leadership and Development emphasizes issues relevant to managing organizations in diverse cultural, socio-economic and political settings. Topics on board governance, resource development, organizational options and communication skills such as marketing, public relations, organizing and conducting meetings will be explored. Permission required. 

June 5 to June 8, 2017 (Monday - Thursday), 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Instructor:  Michael Swack
CRN: 70839
Credits: 3
This course examines the problems faced by development practitioners in financing development activities. The course first focuses on financial markets and the financial needs of development projects and ventures. It will then look at the institutional structures capable of providing development capital in appropriate ways for various development projects. In evaluating institutional structures we focus on a wide variety of institutional management issues including risk assessment, non-traditional underwriting standards, interest rate structure, portfolio management and managing loan delinquency. The final sessions of the course focus on the critical policy issues in the field of development finance. Permission required. 

May 22 to June 23, 2017 (Tuesdays and Thursdays) 10:10 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Instructor:  Shaleen Cassiily
CRN: 70041
Credits: 4
To assume leadership roles, beginning teachers need to develop an informed understanding of how they can operate effectively as decision-makers and agents of change within educational institutions. Such understanding entails knowledge of the politics, history, organization, and function of schools from a variety of viewpoints: historical, political, and cross-cultural. This course focuses on the structure of public education, on the nature of educational change, and the teacher's role in the change process. 

May 22 to July 14, 2017, Online
Instructor:  Joseph Onosko
CRN: 70428
Credits: 4
Emphasizes the development of understandings, dispositions, and skills necessary to effectively participate in P-12 reform discussion and decision-making. The course focuses on foundational issues related to a) the legitimacy of public education, b) accountability-based national reform efforts, and c) the goals and content of school curricula. This on-line course is required for the M.Ed. in Educational Studies or elective for other degrees. 

May 22 to June 6, 2017 (Monday - Friday), 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Instructor:  Michael Routhier
CRN: 70247 
Credits: 4

This course teaches concepts and applied techniques of Geographic Information System tools and technologies to solve real world Geospatial Science problems across multiple disciplines. Technical topics covered include geospatial data collection, quality, conversion, management, analysis, visualization, and dissemination. Students hands-on-lab and independent exercises use the latest version of ArcGIS software. Development and implementation of a project proposal and an independent project are completed by students to forward individual interests. GSS 805 - There will be an hour lunch break.

May 22 to June 23, 2017, Online
Instructor:  Erin Sharp
CRN: 70567
Credits: 4
Investigations of physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Particular attention to various social practices, policies, and programs that affect sexual attitudes and behaviors. 

July 24 to August 18, 2017 (Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays) 9:10 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 
Instructor:  Katherine Abbot
CRN: 70094
Credits: 4
The idea of justice is central to social, political, and legal theory. Considerations of justice are appealed to in assessing the legitimacy of governments, the fair distributions of goods and opportunities both with nation-states and globally, and to address specific social concerns such as racial or gender discrimination or access to health care. Course examines both historical sources and contemporary debates about the nature of justice. 

May 22 to August 11, 2017, Online 
Instructor:  Robert McDaniel
CRN: 70389
Credits: 3
Weapons and drug trafficking are among the largest underground industries in the world. Generating hundreds of billions of dollars in annual revenue, and spawning a global industry of money laundering, trafficking has profound effects not only in the developing world but also in the well-established economies of Europe, Asia and North America. Trafficking leads also to a series of collateral social issues including increased crime rates, profound societal effects and costs, rampant public corruption and large-scale funding of terrorist activities. This course familiarizes students with the origins and present state of international trafficking in weapons and drugs and the money laundering practices used to conceal it from detection. It includes an examination of how trafficking is conducted on a global scale, what efforts have been undertaken to combat it, and what the international community is doing to address the many complex issues involved. International standards and cross-cultural obstacles are examined, as are political implications. The course will examine the approaches to these problems used in countries that have a strong interest or participation in trafficking. In addition, international best practices and standards will be critically assessed. 

May 22 to August 11, 2017, Online
Instructor:  Audrey Roofeh
CRN: 70678
Credits: 3
Forced labor is a crime that affects individuals around the world. This crime affects many different kinds of people in different situations, and as a result, the legal means for addressing human trafficking, and the implications of their use are varied. The course will provide practitioners with background, and information about the scope and breadth of legal tools to address different forms of human trafficking. This course is a follow-up to the Human Trafficking I. That course is a survey course broadly covering the field. This focuses on a particular area. In addition, we will be working with the Polaris Project, a major international non-profit advocacy group to offer webinars/online symposia to expand our visibility in this area. 

May 22 to July 28, 2017, Online
Instructor:  Joanne Samuels
CRN: 70093
Credits: 3
Emphasizes identification of emerging issues that have an impact on the health care system and nursing in providing leadership to address these issues. Students analyze problems and process solutions from a nursing perspective with reasoned approach to their resolution

May 22 to June 21, 2017 (Mondays and Wednesdays) 5:31 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pandora Building 531
Instructor:  David Laflamme
CRN: 70913
Credits: 3 
An introduction to program evaluation as it relates to public health practice and research, primarily in the United States. Public health-specific examples are presented throughout the course. Includes discussion of striking a balance between scientific rigor and the practicalities often faced by program evaluators. 
Manchester Campus

June 26 to July 26, 2017 (Mondays and Wednesdays) 5:31 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pandora Building 531
Instructor:  Karla Armenti
CRN: 70915
Credits: 3 
Overview of occupational safety and health policy in the U.S. Focus on the legal context, especially on OSHA, and provides an analytical framework for examining the role of social, economic, and political factors in the recognition and control of occupational hazards. Some attention to the more technical aspects of this field (e.g., industrial hygiene, ergonomics, general health and safety); emphasis on understanding current occupational health and safety policies and controversies. 
Manchester Campus

June 27 to July 27, 2017 (Tuesdays and Thursdays) 5:31 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pandora Building 142
Instructor:  Terry Knowles
CRN: 70918
Credits: 3 
Identification, analysis, evaluation and application of effective communication and negotiation skills. Course will include case studies, and simulation/role-playing exercises. 
Manchester Campus

May 23 to June 22, 2017 (Tuesdays and Thursdays) 5:31 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. | Pandora Building  142
Instructor:  Tama Andrews
CRN: 70922
Credits: 3 
New Hampshire is a small state in terms of size and population – but its government and politics are as complex, influential, and intriguing as those of the largest states in the US. This course will focus on how and why NH does what it does, and will cover the development and structure of NH’s government and institutions; the influence of politics on and the ever-changing political dynamics of the state; and how these elements shape and determine NH public policy. Several guest speakers will provide in-depth knowledge of and perspective on specific topics. The course is open to all MPA, MBA, MPH, and other graduate level students who wish to learn more about this state where they live and work.
Manchester Campus

June 2 to June 23, 2017 (Fridays)  6:01 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. | Pandora Building 302
June 3 to June 24, 2017 (Saturdays) 9:01 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. | Pandora Building 302

Instructor:  Brian Miller
CRN: 70928
Credits: 3 
This course focuses on the science of addictions and co-occurring disorders and how myths and beliefs effect policy, programming and practice. Students get the opportunity to explore cultural myths, beliefs, stigma and prejudices regarding addictions (alcohol, illicit drugs, prescription drugs, as well as eating disorders, tobacco, and gambling), and co-occurring disorders that becomes national and state policy and programming. 
Manchester Campus

June 15 to June 16, 2017 (Thursdays and Fridays)  8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. | New Hampshire Hall G44
June 22
 to June 23, 2017 (Thursdays and Fridays)  8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. | New Hampshire Hall G44
June 26, 2017 (Monday)  8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. | New Hampshire Hall G44
Instructor:  Pamela McPhee
CRN: 70492
Credits:  2 or 3 

Seminar for graduate students. Topics may include: A) Drugs and Chemical Dependency; B) Intimate Partner Violence C) Social Action in Education Settings D) Social Action in the Dominican Republic. May be repeated for different topics. Special fee.

This course is appropriate for individuals who have a strong interest in developing the facilitation skills used to support increased or improved group collaboration. Social workers, medical professionals, case managers, care professionals, policy makers, and care partners are encouraged to attend.

To learn more about UNH course offerings, please click here. 

Contact

Image of Robin

Admissions and General Program Information:
Robin Husslage 
carsey.mpp@unh.edu
603.862.2338